Students

These immunocompromised college students felt isolated when the fall semester began. So they did something about it

On the list of proposed topics: “Have you had a hard time with friends in the pandemic?”, “Are you planning to go back to school in the fall?” and “How have you been coping on a day-to-day basis?”

But Lynch quickly realized that the group of immunocompromised college students didn’t need questions to guide them. They just wanted to talk about their shared feeling of isolation during the pandemic.

They bonded over the fact that people assume that all teens are healthy. They questioned whether their schools were taking the right measures to help those who are more at-risk. They vented about their friends not understanding their inability to leave the house without fear of contracting Covid.

It’s a virtual support group for immunocompromised students — but its members don’t call it that. They prefer the name “Chronic and Iconic.”

They're living with an invisible illness. Social distancing will save their lives

It all started with a social media post. Lynch, who

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We Need More Students Studying Family Medicine

In 2019, a Policy One-Pager produced by the Robert Graham Center reported that the percentage of the active U.S. physician workforce in primary care practice declined from 32% in 2010 to 30% in 2018. Although family physicians represent 4 in 10 primary care physicians, in several states, a large percentage of family physicians are older than 55 years and anticipated to transition to part-time practice or retire by 2030. The immediate prospects for replacing them are poor. Graduates of 14 U.S. allopathic medical schools that were newly accredited since 2002 and had at least one graduating class by 2015 were actually 40% less likely to enter family medicine than graduates of the 118 previously existing schools.

Recognizing the imperative to not only maintain but expand the family medicine workforce to meet the population’s needs, the Workforce and Education Development team of Family Medicine for America’s Health recommended adoption of a

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COVID-19 will hit colleges when students arrive for fall semester. So why open at all? Money is a factor.

Colleges that are reopening campuses this fall know they’re bringing a higher risk of coronavirus to their community.

The questions aren’t really about if or when, but about how bad outbreaks could be — and whether having an in-person experience for students is worth the cost. With so much at stake, some students, parents and faculty are asking: Why take the risk at all? 

In many cases, it comes back to money. 

For months, colleges and experts have warned another semester of remote courses could have disastrous effects on student enrollment and college budgets.

Colleges already lost billions of dollars when they pivoted to digital instruction in the spring, in the form of refunded room-and-board payments and expensive technology for online courses. Another semester — or year — of online courses could be even worse, especially for universities without large endowments. 

For any institution, online instruction also means no money

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A-level students take legal action against Ofqual as 200,000 sign online petition

A protest outside the Department for Education earlier this week. (Getty)
A protest outside the Department for Education earlier this week. (Getty)

A-level students have launched legal action against England’s exam regulator Ofqual over what they describe as a “ridiculous and insane” marking system.

Thousands of teenagers were left angered after almost 40% of predicted grades were downgraded by the regulator’s “moderation” algorithm, leaving many missing out on their first choice universities.

Ofqual issued guidance on Saturday setting out the criteria for students to make appeals on the basis of their mock exam results, only for it to be taken down hours later.

In a brief statement, Ofqual said the policy was “being reviewed” by its board and that further information would be released “in due course”.

A student receives his A Level results on Thursday. (Getty)
A student receives his A Level results on Thursday. (Getty)

The Good Law Project is now supporting six students over a judicial review of Ofqual’s “failings”.

Data from Ofqual shows independent schools saw an

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L.A. schools announce massive COVID-19 testing, tracing initiative for all students, staff

Los Angeles Unified School District staff member Adrian Pacheco demonstrates the use of sanitizing tools as Supt. Austin Beutner takes a tour of Burbank Middle School. As the academic school year looms, preparations have been under way to make campuses safe. <span class="copyright">(Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times)</span>
Los Angeles Unified School District staff member Adrian Pacheco demonstrates the use of sanitizing tools as Supt. Austin Beutner takes a tour of Burbank Middle School. As the academic school year looms, preparations have been under way to make campuses safe. (Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times)

The Los Angeles Unified School District on Sunday said it was launching an ambitious coronavirus testing and contact tracing program for all students and staff aiming to create a path to safely reopening campuses in the nation’s second-largest school district.

If the plan comes to fruition as described, it would be one of the most extensive to date for an American school district. It remains unclear, however, how quickly it would be implemented and when in-person learning could resume.

L.A. schools Supt. Austin Beutner outlined the plan in an opinion article in the Los Angeles Times published Sunday, saying “the goal is to get students

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Students taking legal action against Ofqual as 22,000 sign online petition

A protest outside the Department for Education earlier this week. (Getty)
A protest outside the Department for Education earlier this week. (Getty)

A-level students have launched legal action against England’s exam regulator Ofqual over what they describe as a “ridiculous and insane” marking system.

Thousands of teenagers were left angered after almost 40% of predicted grades were downgraded by the regulator’s “moderation” algorithm, leaving many missing out on their first choice universities.

Ofqual issued guidance on Saturday setting out the criteria for students to make appeals on the basis of their mock exam results, only for it to be take down hours later.

In a brief statement, Ofqual said the policy was “being reviewed” by its board and that further information would be released “in due course”.

A student receives his A Level results on Thursday. (Getty)
A student receives his A Level results on Thursday. (Getty)

The Good Law Project is now supporting six students over a judicial review of Ofqual’s “failings”.

Data from Ofqual shows independent schools saw an

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Our Covid cohort of students will need more mental health support than ever

student looking at books - Getty Images
student looking at books – Getty Images

Going to university is a time of great transition. And while those first moments at university can be very exciting, transitions are also times when young people face an increased risk of mental health difficulties. We also know that the years between 16 and 25 are when people are most likely to experience mental health difficulties for the first time.  

Students have always experienced pressures, such as worries about their finances, including housing costs and managing the cost of living. They also need to get used to a different type of learning than at school. 

Plus, they are also leaving behind all their existing social support, the teachers, friends and family that are typically protective for young people’s mental health. 

There are specific points in students’ lives when there can be additional pressures. These might occur a few weeks into term when people

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High-risk students ask, why can’t all college courses be offered online?

College sophomore Cameron Lynch has lived the past five months in a single square mile, only venturing outside her home a couple times a week for early-morning or late-night walks.

“It’s already a stressful time to be immunocompromised,” said Lynch, who has Type 1 diabetes, celiac disease and a form of muscular dystrophy. “Now, a good portion of able-bodied people are going back to the way life was, leaving us behind.”

Several weeks ago, Lynch, who attends the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, authored a letter expressing her frustrations and posted it to social media. She never expected the response she would get: Dozens of immunocompromised college students from across the U.S. started reaching out to her, so they formed a support group to share information on the policies their schools were implementing.

Lynch is just one of the thousands of college students with weakened immune systems

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Should students get a discount if they won’t be on campus because of COVID-19?

<span class="caption">COVID-19 has caused colleges to spend more to cope with the pandemic. </span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/beautiful-young-woman-working-at-home-with-dog-royalty-free-image/1215354586?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:elenaleonova/GettyImages">elenaleonova/GettyImages</a></span>
COVID-19 has caused colleges to spend more to cope with the pandemic. elenaleonova/GettyImages

Not long after the COVID-19 pandemic caused colleges to start teaching remotely, students balked at the idea of paying full tuition for online learning. It’s not hard to understand why. After all, they were not getting the football and basketball games, student clubs, access to labs and the library and the out-of-class conversations that are all part of the typical campus experience.

Although students who study online will not pay the room, board and activities fees that typically cover nonacademic costs, concern about paying full tuition continues this fall, as many universities opt to continue online instruction in the interest of keeping students, faculty and staff safe from the pandemic.

Is it right to expect to pay less tuition for online learning? Or are colleges justified in charging the full tuition price when classes – at least

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College students face financial strains, health concerns from pandemic ahead of fall semester

Brittany Goddard’s final semester at Howard University isn’t the dream ending she imagined in Washington, D.C. 

When the coronavirus pandemic shut down the U.S. economy in March, she scrambled to pack up her belongings since she had to be out of her dorm room within 48 hours. At the same time, she lost her part-time job at a catering company and still hasn’t received unemployment after filing for jobless benefits in April. 

She was set to study abroad in Barcelona over the summer, but those plans were upended due to the pandemic. And with just weeks to go before the fall semester begins, she’s worried about how she’ll pay the remaining balance of her tuition and fees – roughly $9,000 – since her financial aid won’t cover it at the private school.

“It’s heartbreaking. I’m a low-income student. I can’t afford tuition,” Goddard, 20, says, who’s created a GoFundMe page … Read More