reopening

Baltimore County school board to vote on reopening plan during special meeting Tuesday

The Baltimore County Board of Education is scheduled to vote on its reopening plan for the 2020-21 academic year Tuesday evening and is expected to approve a virtual return to the classrooms.

Last week, Baltimore County Public Schools superintendent Darryl L. Williams said during a virtual school board meeting that he supported keeping remote learning in place for the start of the school year amid the coronavirus pandemic, citing the safety of students and faculty.

The meeting will stream at 5:05 p.m. and can be viewed online at BCPS TV.

The Baltimore County teachers union and four other unions representing county school system employees said they do not want to return to school buildings until they feel it’s safe. Several school board members also have voiced their support for the remote learning option.

The Maryland State Education Association, Baltimore Teachers Union and the Maryland Parent Teacher Association called on state

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Fall 2020 Reopening Plans At The Top 100 U.S. Business Schools

They’ll be following all the rules this fall at the University of Michigan: masks, social distancing, smaller class sizes, frequent hand and surface washing, and more — much more. They’ll also be pioneering new rules for a new reality, particularly in the realm of remote instruction, as befits one of the country’s leading centers of social and cultural innovation. Put it all together and Scott DeRue, dean of the Ross School of Business, expects a memorable term.

“As with every year, I’m looking forward to welcoming students back to campus safely for a very successful fall term,” DeRue says. “Of course, I also recognize the profound difficulties that many of our students face in this moment, and that much uncertainty remains for all of us. We will get through this, and we will do it together.”

Five months after it shut down business school campuses and curtailed spring instruction and … Read More

Facing uncertain fall, schools make flexible reopening plans

MANCHESTER, Mo. (AP) — Administrators in the Parkway school district in suburban St. Louis spent the summer break crafting a flexible reopening plan, with options that include full-time classroom learning, full-time online instruction and a hybrid system.

It’s a good thing because the dangers of the coronavirus are so uncertain that district officials are reluctant to make predictions about the fall semester, which begins in only five weeks. Confirmed coronavirus infections in Missouri’s hardest-hit city waned in June, but they are now spiking, along with hospitalizations. Schools plan to resume classes Aug. 24.

“If you had asked me even two weeks ago, ‘Do you think we would be able to come back?’ I would have said, ‘Yeah,’” Assistant Superintendent Kevin Beckner said. “Today my answer is ‘I’m not sure,’ just because of how the situation has changed so quickly.”

Schools around the U.S. face the same dilemma. With the number

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Hillsborough School Board Grapples With School Reopening Mandate

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FL — She’s the mom of a 13-year-old son with pre-existing medical conditions and an elementary school teacher. That makes Ariane Hargrave of Apollo Beach doubly skeptical about plans to reopen Hillsborough County public schools next month.

Hargrave said any viral illness exacerbates her son’s severe asthma “to the point that I ended up having to get a nebulizer unit at school, so he wouldn’t have to miss any days.”

“If kids return to school as normal, I won’t be sending him,” she said. “Part of me, for the sake of maintaining a paycheck and benefits, still wants the option of working in any capacity. However, for him, I’ll ensure he socializes in a more controlled environment.”

Hargrave said fellow teachers she knows are equally torn between the need to return work and help support their families or remain at home to protect themselves and their children from

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Texas gives school districts more leeway in reopening schools amid pandemic

AUSTIN, Texas — Amid growing angst among parents and educators, the Texas Education Agency softened its stance on in-person instruction mandates as schools navigate around the coronavirus pandemic.

The agency issued new rules Friday that give local school districts more control over the decisions on start dates and on how long schools can remain closed and teach students online.

Also on Friday, Gov. Greg Abbott announced that the state will allocate $200 million in federal coronavirus aid to purchase of eLearning devices and internet access to help families who don’t have WiFi to be able to learn remotely.

The Texas agency’s new rules come a week after the agency laid out guidelines that required parents to choose between sending their children to school in person all the time or only being educated online, rather than any combination of the two.

Also last week, the state education commissioner in Florida called 

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Reopening Schools Is Critical. Teachers Should Do More to Help.

(Bloomberg Opinion) — When the Los Angeles Unified School District announced on Monday that it will not resume any in-person instruction this fall, it was a political victory for teachers and a defeat for families, science and opportunity for all.

The teachers’ union opposed reopening schools amid the continuing rise in Covid-19 cases locally, and lobbied for an early resolution to eliminate uncertainty.

Individual teachers were adamant about not taking risks. “As a teacher of 20 years, I can tell you there is NO WAY I would agree to go back to the classroom this year without hospital-grade PPE,” one wrote on the NextDoor social media site.

“I’ve taught for 15 years,” wrote another. “I catch every cold, sniffle and cough that enters my room. Call me selfish but I’m not willing to die so we can be less inconvenienced.”

In a city where President Donald Trump is the devil,

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Back-to-school reopening plans have few details on how many COVID-19 cases would close schools

Even as they recommended working to reopen schools in-person, the nation’s science academies warned: “It is likely that someone in the school community will contract COVID-19.” 

But largely missing from the reopening protocols at states and schools around the nation are concrete plans for what administrators are to do when coronavirus infections enter a school.

The prospect of reopening school in the fall is already looking less likely in much of the nation. Confirmed COVID-19 cases in the U.S. have skyrocketed to nearly 3.6 million, and more than half of states have paused or scaled back efforts to reopen their economies. A growing number of school districts, including Los Angeles, the second-largest in the U.S., have decided to start the fall semester online. Other districts are pushing back their start dates.

A parent’s guide to online school: 9 questions to ask to vet your back-to-school choices

But many still plan

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More than half of all states, including California and Michigan, pause reopening or take steps to halt the spread of COVID-19

A week after the United States surpassed 3,000,000 coronavirus cases — around a quarter of the world’s cases and deaths — the coronavirus pandemic continues unabated. 

Governors and other leaders in states including California, Texas and Michigan continue to grapple with plans to reopen their economies – or slow them down again – amid this severe uptick in cases. Twenty-five states have taken action to cut down on skyrocketing COVID-19 cases.

Among measures on the table: shutting down high-capacity businesses such as bars and gyms, halting elective surgeries and requiring people to wear masks. 

Here is a look at which states have paused their reopening or taken other steps. This list is continually updated.

Alabama

After days of an “alarming” upward climb in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations, Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey announced she will enforce a statewide mask order starting July 16. 

Ivey had previously said she believed a statewide

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Schools Should Prioritize Reopening, But They Need A Lot More Money: New Report

Schools should try to reopen if they think they can do so safely, prioritizing students with disabilities and children in kindergarten through fifth grade, according to a report released Wednesday. However, schools likely won’t be able to take all the necessary precautions without an injection of resources from states and the federal government. 

The new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, which compiles months of research from education and medical experts, offers one of the most comprehensive looks at the costs and benefits of U.S. schools reopening amid the coronavirus pandemic. Over its more than 80 pages, the report outlines the potentially dire health risks communities could face if schools are reopened hastily and asks school and community leaders to engage in constant risk assessment.

Although the report ultimately stresses the importance of providing students with in-person learning opportunities, it also details the tremendous challenges that

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How California went from a rapid reopening to a second closing in one month

Hannah Mikus demonstrates how to administer a coronavirus self-test to drivers at the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science in South Los Angeles. <span class="copyright">(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Hannah Mikus demonstrates how to administer a coronavirus self-test to drivers at the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science in South Los Angeles. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Two months ago, California looked like a coronavirus success story.

The first-in-the-nation stay-at-home order helped the state avoid the explosion of cases and deaths that New York and New Jersey had experienced, and officials said it was safe to begin reopening the economy.

But the last six weeks have been a disaster. Coronavirus cases have spiked, along with hospitalizations. In a few counties, hospitals are approaching capacity.

Schools in Los Angeles and San Diego as well as parts of the Bay Area say they won’t open campuses for in-person learning this fall. And many of the businesses that were allowed to reopen in May — shopping malls, indoor dining establishments, bars, movie theaters — are again closed in many

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