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Dentist who yanked patient’s tooth out while on hoverboard jailed

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A rogue dentist who was filmed extracting a patient’s tooth while riding a hoverboard has been jailed for 12 years for dangerous dentistry.

Seth Lockhart shot to notoriety after he was filmed pulling the tooth from unconscious patient Veronica Wilhelm while riding the gadget, and was jailed in Anchorage, Alaska, on Monday for crimes including knocking patients out without receiving adequate training – or their consent.

Judge Michael Wolverton said: ‘Lookhart almost killed many patients by performing anesthesia thousands of times without training or consent, on patients outside his scope of training and expertise, while stealing money from Medicaid and embezzling from his bosses.’

Lockhart let his office manager Shauna Cranford – who was in on the fraud – extract a patient’s tooth despite her not having any dental training.

Disgraced dentist Seth Lockhart – who was once filmed extracting a patient’s tooth
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Doctors Should Watch for Punctured Lungs in COVID Patients | Health News

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

TUESDAY, Sept. 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Punctured lungs occur in as many as 1 in 100 hospitalized COVID-19 patients, a new study finds.

Before the pandemic, this problem was typically seen in very tall young men or older patients with severe lung disease. But some British researchers noticed that several patients with COVID-19 developed the condition and decided to investigate.

“We started to see patients affected by a punctured lung, even among those who were not put on a ventilator,” said Stefan Marciniak, a professor at the University of Cambridge Institute of Medical Research.

“To see if this was a real association, I put a call out to respiratory colleagues across the U.K. via Twitter,” Marciniak said in a university news release. “The response was dramatic — this was clearly something that others in the field were seeing.”

The researchers noted that damage

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New England Journal of Medicine publishes study results evaluating Ionis antisense therapy in treatment of patients with hereditary angioedema

CARLSBAD, Calif., Sept. 2, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: IONS) announced the publication today of the results from a compassionate-use study evaluating IONIS-PKKRx and IONIS-PKK-LRx in patients living with severe bradykinin-mediated angioedema in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). IONIS-PKKRx and IONIS-PKK-LRx are investigational antisense medicines designed to reduce the production of prekallikrein, or PKK, which plays a key role in the activation of inflammatory mediators associated with acute attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE). In the study, researchers found that the drugs reduced plasma prekallikrein activity levels and showed evidence of clinical efficacy in reducing the number of breakthrough attacks per month in patients over the course of the treatment, including complete resolution in a patient with Type 1 HAE. To view the published study, please visit NEJM.org.

Hereditary angioedema is a rare autosomal dominant disease that results in recurrent, painful attacks

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Israeli hospital enlists recovered coronavirus patients as volunteers for COVID-19 ward

Hadassah University hospital in Jerusalem is running a pilot program in which recovered coronavirus patients volunteer to help those currently hospitalized with COVID-19, BBC reports.

The hospital’s 30 or so recovered volunteers — who have all been tested to confirm they have antibodies for the virus and wear full protective gear (since it’s still unclear how long immunity lasts) — aren’t performing any medical tasks. Rather, they’re there to lend an ear or sit and talk with patients who would otherwise be in isolation. Dr. Rely Alon, the director of nursing at Hadassah, told BBC that the volunteers are a “great help” for both patients and staff, even if their tasks sound simple.

That’s because, while first and foremost COVID-19 is a deadly disease that may have lasting, harmful affects on the human body, scientists are also concerned about the potential long-term mental health issues that could arise for hospitalized

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Organized Medicine Is Putting Profit Ahead of Patients, and It’s Making America Sick

AUSTIN, Texas, Aug. 26, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Today, President Sophia L. Thomas, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, PPCNP-BC, FNAP, FAANP, and Chief Executive Officer David Hebert, JD, of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners® (AANP) issued the following statement regarding organized medicine’s shameful attacks on high-quality nurse practitioner (NP) care amidst the COVID-19 pandemic:

“As our nation faces the most significant health crisis in the last 100 years, it is disappointing that organized medicine is focusing its attention, not on expanding access to health care for patients, but on attacking our country’s more than 290,000 NPs as they work to ensure continued access to care for all patients — including those suffering from COVID-19 and health care disparities — in primary, acute and specialty care settings,” said David Hebert, JD, Chief Executive Officer of AANP. “These assaults, ranging from deceit-filled press conferences to Twitter rants and error-ridden

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Synthetic cells might improve insulin production for Type 1 diabetes patients

Aug. 19 (UPI) — Researchers have generated synthetic insulin-producing pancreatic cells for people with Type 1 diabetes that can evade the immune system, according to a study published Wednesday by the journal Nature.

If the cells prove to be safe and effective, they could be used to replace damaged cells in the pancreas with “lab-generated human islet-like cell clusters that produce normal amounts of insulin on demand” in people with Type 1 diabetes, study lead researcher Ronald Evans told UPI.

The cells, made from human stem cells, controlled blood glucose in mice and didn’t need the immunosuppressive drugs required for most transplant patients, said researchers at the Salk Institute in California, where Evans is March of Dimes Chair in Molecular and Developmental Biology.

While use of the synthetic cells in humans is likely several years away, researchers say the development shows promise for a difficult to manage disease.

Type 1

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More than 4,700 active patients, 9,000 deaths nationwide

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

4,780 active COVID-19 cases in Canada: 122,872 diagnoses, 9,032 deaths and 109,060 recoveries (as of Aug. 17, 11:30 a.m. ET)

  • Alberta – 1,132 active cases (12,412 total cases, including 224 deaths, 11,056 resolved)

  • British Columbia – 743 active cases (4,594 total cases, 198 deaths, 3,653 resolved)

  • Manitoba – 232 active cases (731 total cases, 9 deaths, 490 resolved)

  • New Brunswick -15 active cases (186 cases, 2 deaths, 169 resolved)

  • Newfoundland and Labrador – 2 active cases (268 total cases, 3 deaths, 263 resolved)

  • Northwest Territories –

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More than 4,500 active patients, 9,000 deaths nationwide

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

4,594 active COVID-19 cases in Canada: 122,090 diagnoses, 9,026 deaths and 108,484 recoveries (as of Aug. 17, 11:30 a.m. ET)

  • Alberta – 1,036 active cases (12,053 total cases, including 221 deaths, 10,796 resolved)

  • British Columbia – 629 active cases (4,358 total cases, 196 deaths, 3,533 resolved)

  • Manitoba – 205 active cases (697 total cases, 9 deaths, 483 resolved)

  • New Brunswick -15 active cases (186 cases, 2 deaths, 169 resolved)

  • Newfoundland and Labrador – 2 active cases (268 total cases, 3 deaths, 263 resolved)

  • Northwest Territories –

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Dentist: Closure of practices impacts patients’ oral health

JOHNSTON, R.I. (WPRI) ─ A Johnston dentist believes dentistry is an essential business, but argues that it hasn’t been treated as such throughout the coronavirus pandemic.

Rupesh Udeshi, dentist and co-owner of Dental Associates of Rhode Island, said the months his practice was closed had a big impact on the health of many of his patients.

“We’ve had a great backlog and problems that were minor, that have become major. The patient may have just had a cavity or needed a filling, but we haven’t seen them and it’s now more severe and it’s a root canal, and some people who maybe needed a root canal ─ now they need to have the tooth out,” he said.

The World Health Organization recently recommended delaying routine dental care because of the pandemic. But the American Dental Association says they “respectfully yet strongly disagrees.”

“Oral health is integral to overall health. Dentistry

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We Need to Take Care of the Growing Number of Long-Term COVID-19 Patients

On July 7, 2020, the Boston Red Sox pitcher Eduardo Rodriguez tested positive for the new coronavirus. He was scheduled to start Opening Day for the Sox, but the virus had other plans—damaging Rodriguez’s heart and causing a condition called myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle). Now the previously fit 27-year old ace left-hander must sit out the 2020 season to recover.

Rodriguez is not alone in having heart damage from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. In a new study done in Germany, researchers studied the hearts of 100 patients who had recently recovered from COVID-19. The findings were alarming: 78 patients had heart abnormalities, as shown by a special kind of imaging test that shows the heart’s structure (a cardiac MRI), and 60 had myocarditis. These patients were mostly young and previously healthy. Several had just returned from ski trips.

While other studies have shown a lower rate

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