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Google searches for anxiety soar to record at start of coronavirus pandemic: Study

If you turned to Google for help diagnosing an anxiety attack as the coronavirus pandemic swept through the U.S. earlier this year, a new study suggests you weren’t alone. 

Researchers from the Qualcomm Institute at the University of California San Diego analyzed Google Trends dating back 16 years and found that people searched for severe anxiety-related information at record highs beginning in March when the coronavirus pandemic was first declared a national emergency.

Researchers looked for searches on “anxiety” or “panic” in combination with “attack,” such as “panic attack,” “signs of anxiety attack,” “anxiety attack symptoms,” and so forth, according to the study published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine. 

Anxiety-related searches were roughly 11% higher than usual over the 58 days after President Donald Trump declared a national emergency on March 13, according to the researchers who worked in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University, Barnard College and the Institute for

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Waltham To Start School Mostly Online

WALTHAM, MA — The district is planning to have most students begin the school year remotely.

At a meeting on July 29 the school committee voted to go with a remote/hybrid return to school. The committee discussed the options again on August 5, but chose not to re-vote, so the July 29 decision stands, according to Superintendent Brian Reagan.

“The issue is it’s a very emotional conversation for folks,” Reagan told the School Committee at the time. “We’re addressing all concerns. We certainly don’t take them lightly at all. That’s all we think about.”

The district will publish its final plan next week, he said.

In Waltham’s reopening model nearly all students will begin the year online. In accordance with state guidance, they will prioritize certain populations for in-person learning.

Students on Individualized Educational Plans who spend at least 75 percent of their day in a special setting as well

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California processing backlog; deadly start to August in Sacramento

The coronavirus is continuing its deadly impact in the Sacramento region, with August already off to a troubling start.

Public health officials, in a Monday update to Sacramento County’s COVID-19 data dashboard, confirmed several more July deaths for nearly 80 in the month, including the deadliest day of the pandemic, and have already confirmed well over a dozen resident deaths from the virus in the first six days of August.

In a breakdown of coronavirus deaths as they’ve occurred by day — as opposed to the dates on which cause of death is made official or is first disclosed publicly — the county now reports a stunning 79 fatalities for the month of July. That’s more than double the previous worst month of April, when 34 died, and over quadruple the 18 observed in each of May and June as the curve of the virus had appeared to be flattening

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Framingham Teacher Uses Summer School To Prep For Fall Start

FRAMINGHAM, MA — At age 23, Walsh Middle School health teacher Monique Bisnette describes herself as the “new kid on the block.” But when school in Framingham starts this fall, she may have an edge over her colleagues on how to teach during the coronavirus pandemic.

This summer, Bisnette was one of a handful of Framingham teachers who taught all-remote summer school classes. Tasked with teaching physical education online, she designed a simplified curriculum, but one that was very interactive.

When the pandemic shut Framingham schools down in March, Bisnette decided to condense the remainder of her health curriculum for 6th, 7th and 8th graders around human anatomy. With that method, she was able to lay the groundwork for school this fall, where students will learn about topics like substance abuse.

“We always go back to explaining things about how the body system works,” she said.

That was her launching

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Everything you need to start cycling: A beginner’s guide

From the best bike worth buying to the essential safety equipment you shouldn't leave home without, this is your go-to guide to cycling: iStock
From the best bike worth buying to the essential safety equipment you shouldn’t leave home without, this is your go-to guide to cycling: iStock

If you’re feeling a little restless with your exercise regimen and want to try something new, try cycling.

Not only will it keep you fit, but it’ll also help you get the most out of your time outdoors and explore your local area.

Sam Jones from Cycling UK told The Independent: “Cycling remains one of the best in terms of safely maintaining social distancing.”

Aside from a form of exercise, as lockdown restrictions ease and people start returning to work, cycling is also being encouraged by the government as a better mode of transport – along with driving. It’s a good way to avoid coming into close contact with people as people do on buses, trains and Tubes.

As part of the government’s plans to boost

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The race is elite-only this year, but here’s how to start running for 2021

iStock
iStock

The pandemic has put a stop to sporting events across the UK and one of the biggest to be cancelled is the London Marathon.

The event – which would have been its 40th anniversary – was due to be held on Sunday 26 April, but this date was postponed until October 2020. This year’s race will still go ahead on 3 October, but it will now only involve elite athletes, meaning the other 45,000 runners will not be able to take part.

The 2021 marathon has also been moved from its traditional April date to October, in order to give as many runners as possible the chance to partake in the race.

In April, to mark the original date of this year’s marathon, people were encouraged to join in on the 2.6 challenge. The idea was to complete an activity related to the number 26 (as that’s the amount

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Biden won’t go to Milwaukee for convention; Chicago schools to start online; Florida surpasses 500,000 cases

Another pharmaceutical giant announced a vaccine deal with the U.S. on Wednesday while Joe Biden and the rest of the Democratic celebs bid adieu to Milwaukee’s political convention before the coronation train ever rolled into town.

Johnson & Johnson said it has a $1 billion agreement to supply 100 million doses of its vaccine candidate to the U.S. government. Also Wednesday, Moderna said it expects to fully enroll 30,000 people for a trial of its vaccine candidate next month. And a day earlier, Novavax released promising results of an early trial. 

Milwaukee’s 2020 Democratic National Convention suffers the same fate as Charlotte, where plans for a full-blown GOP convention have been whittled down to a few small gatherings later this month.

While the nation waits for a vaccine that could fully reopen schools and businesses, the University of Connecticut became the first top-level college program to cancel its football season.

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Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than a dozen

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Online school? Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may continue to exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than

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Top PA Health Official ‘Optimistic’ For In-Person Fall Start

HARRISBURG, PA — Pennsylvania health officials affirmed Thursday that the state remains committed to reopening schools for in-person learning this fall, stressing that the actions we take now will determine the safety of the environment when children and teachers return to the classrooms.

Pennsylvania Secretary of Health Rachel Levine, speaking during a Thursday news conference, said the state maintains its goal “right now” is that schools will be open for in-person learning this fall. She noted many districts are planning varying degrees of in-person instruction, including hybrid or matrix models.

“We are going to stay positive and optimistic that there will be in-person school when school opens in August and we’ll be working towards that,” Levine said.

But, she stressed, there are things we can do now to ensure that goal happens, like wearing masks and following the governor’s mitigation guidelines.

“That’s why the mitigation efforts we have talked about

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