Mental

Young people struggle with finding mental health support amid COVID pandemic

Kathryn Boit feels “guilty for struggling so much” these past few months. 

As the president of the Harvard Student Mental Health Liaisons, she has “college friends, acquaintances, and strangers reach out to me for resources and advice,” she said. “I don’t know the answers anymore.”

It’s no wonder Boit, a Harvard sophomore, feels overwhelmed. Prevalence of depression among college students increased since the pandemic caused the closure of campuses this spring compared to fall 2019, according to a survey of 18,000 college students published by the Healthy Minds Network on July 9. And of the nearly 42% of students who sought mental health care during the pandemic, 60% said it was either much more or somewhat more difficult to access care.

Mental health among young people has been worsening for years. A 2019 analysis of teens reported 13% of U.S. teens ages 12 to 17 (or 3.2 million) said in

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8 Back-to-School Mental Health Resources for BIPOC Students

Student sitting cross-legged with an open laptop in her lap against a pink background
Student sitting cross-legged with an open laptop in her lap against a pink background

Many parents and children are looking forward to back-to-school season and easing into a regular schedule once again. Student mental health was already a growing concern before COVID-19. Depression among adolescents in the U.S. has been increasing steadily over the years.

BIPOC students particularly may experience more negative circumstances such as racial/ethnic discrimination, marginalization, and lack of access to resources and services that contribute negatively to their mental health. There are many online resources that can help BIPOC students manage their mental health as back-to-school season begins.

Here are eight back-to-school mental health resources for BIPOC students:

The Steve Fund is an organization dedicated to supporting the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color. The Fund works with colleges and universities, nonprofits, researchers, mental health experts, families, and young people to promote programs

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‘Doomscrolling’ is bad for your mental health. Do this instead

We’ve all been there: You hop on your phone to learn what’s unfolding with the pandemic or in the political landscape and all of sudden you’re completely sucked in by the latest bit of bad news. Your heart rate quickens as you flick through post after post after post. It’s all terrible, but you can’t stop now. You need to know. Your thumb can scarcely keep up with your eyes as you scan hungrily for more information. When your screen runs out of fresh content, you hit refresh and the ride starts all over.

It’s called “doomscrolling” (or “doomsurfing”) — a portmanteau that Merriam-Webster defines as “referring to the tendency to continue to surf or scroll through bad news, even though that news is saddening, disheartening or depressing”. The word likely first appeared in a tweet (fitting given that Twitter is the ideal platform for doomscrolling) back in 2018,

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Kids’ mental health can struggle during online school. Here’s how teachers are planning ahead.

When her South Carolina high school went online this spring, Maya Green struggled through the same emotions as many of her fellow seniors: She missed her friends. Her online assignments were too easy. She struggled to stay focused.

But Green, 18, also found herself working harder for the teachers who knew her well and cared about her. 

“My school doesn’t do a ton of lessons on social and emotional learning,” said Green, who just graduated from Charleston County School of the Arts, a magnet school, and is headed to Stanford University. “But I grew up in this creative writing program, and I’m really close to my teachers there, and we had at least one purposeful conversation about my emotions after we moved online.”

From the other teachers, Green didn’t hear much to support her mental health.

This was a common complaint among parents when classes went online in March to

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Tips for boosting your child’s mental health during COVID-19

As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on and families spend more time at home, adjusting to “the new normal” may prove especially difficult for younger children as they gear up for the school year — especially those learning remotely.

While experts are still learning about how the pandemic could affect children’s long-term mental health, they have tips for parents now on supporting their children during these unprecedented times.

1. Maintain a daily routine

“The structured routine is really big” and “firm sleep times” are very important, said Dr. Anju Hurria, a child psychiatrist at the University of California, Irvine.

“I’m often finding myself recommending to parents to create the actual schedule,” said Dr. Kevin Simon, a senior child and adolescent psychiatry fellow at Boston’s Children Hospital/Harvard Medical School.

PHOTO: A woman and two children wear masks at a playground, July 11, 2020, in Los Angeles. (Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP, FILE)

Both

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Online chats with friends and family improve older people’s mental health, reveals UCL research

The results showed internet access could be used to reduce loneliness for older people - Geoges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images
The results showed internet access could be used to reduce loneliness for older people – Geoges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images

Older people who go online daily are happier when they use the internet to stay in touch with friends and family, a major new study has found.

Research by University College London (UCL), which studied the internet habits of 9,000 over 50s over four years, found that participants had better mental health when they used the internet for communication, but felt worse when they used it for information purposes, such as job hunting.

Researchers said the results showed internet access could be used to reduce loneliness and urged the Government to make it easier for older people not yet online to access the web.

The findings contrast with a growing number of studies finding excessive time online or on social media can adversely affect young people’s mental health.

For instance, a 2018

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Why the Recent Kanye West Coverage Has Been Triggering For My Mental Illness

photo of Kanye West on tour in the Netherlands, wearing a dark gray shirt with black stars
photo of Kanye West on tour in the Netherlands, wearing a dark gray shirt with black stars

“We must now realize the promise of America by trusting God, unifying our vision and building our future. I am running for president of the United States #2020VISION” — Kanye West via Twitter, July 4, 2020.

Less than a month ago, Kanye West tweeted his desire to run for President of the United States in 2020. In the midst of recurring, heartbreaking, painful news from the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, police brutality, the fight for equality and social justice for BIPOC, the idea of a self-aggrandizing rapper-turned- designer-turned-church-leader with a famous wife and the world’s most famous children running for president was the balm media agencies and celeb-watchers across North America were looking for.

But for me? For people like me, who see his mental illness in ourselves? For me, the

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We can’t talk about Kanye West’s tweets and presidential aspirations until we address his mental health

Kanye West performs during 2019 Coachella Valley Music And Arts Festival on April 20, 2019 in Indio, California.
Kanye West performs during 2019 Coachella Valley Music And Arts Festival on April 20, 2019 in Indio, California.

Timothy Norris/Getty Images for Coachella

  • Kanye West’s actions over the past month have attracted attention, concern, and headlines.

  • West has openly discussed his bipolar disorder in the past, as well as his reluctance to seek professional treatment like medication.

  • His wife Kim Kardashian West issued a statement asking for “compassion and empathy” from the media and public.

  • Mental health and media experts told Insider that discussions about the substance of West’s tweets, actions, and presidential aspirations need to include context about his mental health. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Throughout July, Kanye West has inspired headlines and captivated online audiences with a series of unexpected and controversial actions. The rapper began the month by announcing his 2020 presidential candidacy and weeks later, issued a series of since-deleted comments about his family,

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Prince William Says Soccer Can Help ‘Break the Stigma Around’ Mental Health Effects of COVID-19 Pandemic

Prince William is using soccer to help those affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

In a video promoting the landmark Mentally Healthy Football Declaration signed by leaders of the entire U.K. soccer family, the Duke of Cambridge openly references the positive role he believes the sport can play.

“This has been a football season unlike any other,” William says in the video. “The coronavirus pandemic has affected everyone, and it is clear it will have a big impact on many people’s mental health. Football’s role in breaking the stigma around mental health has never been more important.”

The Mentally Healthy declaration has been signed by the English Premier League, English Football League, and the soccer associations of England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

It’s also drawn the support of famous names in the soccer world including England manager Gareth Southgate, England captain Harry Kane and Scotland captain Andy Roberston.

A direct

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We can’t talk about Kayne West’s tweets and presidential aspirations until we address his mental health

Kanye West performs during 2019 Coachella Valley Music And Arts Festival on April 20, 2019 in Indio, California.
Kanye West performs during 2019 Coachella Valley Music And Arts Festival on April 20, 2019 in Indio, California.

Timothy Norris/Getty Images for Coachella

  • Kanye West’s actions over the past month have attracted attention, concern, and headlines.

  • West has openly discussed his bipolar disorder in the past, as well as his reluctance to seek professional treatment like medication.

  • His wife Kim Kardashian West issued a statement asking for “compassion and empathy” from the media and public.

  • Mental health and media experts told Insider that discussions about the substance of West’s tweets, actions, and presidential aspirations need to include context about his mental health. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Throughout July, Kanye West has inspired headlines and captivated online audiences with a series of unexpected and controversial actions. The rapper began the month by announcing his 2020 presidential candidacy and weeks later, issued a series of since-deleted comments about his family,

Read More