kids

The Reason Our Kids Can’t Safely Return To School? Our POTUS Is A Dense Cabbage

Talk about a rock and a hard place. This back-to-school season is unlike anything American parents have ever experienced. There are no good options. Whatever you choice you make, you’re a terrible parent according to your neighbor or another parent at your kids’ school or the internet. Whatever choice you make, you’re potentially harming your child emotionally or physically, or both. And, whatever choice you make, you’ll likely end up quarantined anyway and having your kids at home, doing virtual learning for extended periods of time. Because our country and its leaders flatly refuse to get their shit together.

You know where kids can go back to school just fine? New Zealand. Germany. Denmark. Vietnam. Because they actually flattened the curve (in some cases all the way down to zero) unlike the U.S., which did some sort of bizarre half-quarantine for the amount of time it should have taken to

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Here’s how parents can protect their kids from coronavirus as schools reopen

Get ready to pack your back-to-school pencils, binders and … hand sanitizer?

While some schools and universities are opting for remote learning or a hybrid of in-person and online sessions, others are pushing ahead with in-person classes – with proper sanitation protocols, of course. Social distancing markings, COVID program coordinators and smaller class sizes are only a few of the reflections of the pandemic-era classroom experience.

But still, parents may be (reasonably) worried about this transition. Although schools will follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidelines to ensure safety for children, it’s always a good idea to reinforce these standards from home as well.

So what can you do, other than clipping a mini-bottle of hand sanitizer to every backpack? USA TODAY asked two health experts for advice on how parents can keep their students safe and healthy as they prepare for in-person classes. 

New clothes and senior

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Kids less likely to die from coronavirus, but schools could become hot spots for spread

A student gets his temperature checked by a teacher before entering a summer STEM camp at Wylie High School in Texas. Schools across the USA continue to plan on how to reopen schools this fall.
A student gets his temperature checked by a teacher before entering a summer STEM camp at Wylie High School in Texas. Schools across the USA continue to plan on how to reopen schools this fall.

As many school districts across the USA prepare to reopen campuses, some fear classrooms will become the next incubators for large coronavirus outbreaks.

Advocates for resuming school in person, including President Donald Trump, have repeatedly claimed that children pose less of a risk of spreading COVID-19 and that the benefits of returning them to the classroom outweigh the risks of keeping them home. 

Such statements have been used by conservatives, as well as many parents, to argue for a prompt reopening of classrooms.

“We know that children get the virus at a far lower rate than any other part of the population,” U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said during a CNN interview in July. “There’s

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What to know about sending your kids to college during the pandemic

How to go back to college safely during the pandemic
How to go back to college safely during the pandemic

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With the end of summer drawing near, college students and their parents are preparing for a new semester. But for most, going back to school this year will likely look a lot different amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Some colleges and universities are reopening as fully virtual this fall, while others will offer a mix of both online and in-person classes. Those that are choosing to invite students back to campus are doing so with strict sanitation procedures in place along with new changes, like reduced class sizes, solo dorm rooms, and limited dining options. Some are even closing campus after fall break to reduce any risk from out-of-state students who are traveling.

Hannah Grice, a junior at Stevenson University in

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Kids’ mental health can struggle during online school. Here’s how teachers are planning ahead.

When her South Carolina high school went online this spring, Maya Green struggled through the same emotions as many of her fellow seniors: She missed her friends. Her online assignments were too easy. She struggled to stay focused.

But Green, 18, also found herself working harder for the teachers who knew her well and cared about her. 

“My school doesn’t do a ton of lessons on social and emotional learning,” said Green, who just graduated from Charleston County School of the Arts, a magnet school, and is headed to Stanford University. “But I grew up in this creative writing program, and I’m really close to my teachers there, and we had at least one purposeful conversation about my emotions after we moved online.”

From the other teachers, Green didn’t hear much to support her mental health.

This was a common complaint among parents when classes went online in March to

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You still have to get your kids vaccinated even if their California school goes online

Most California kids will kick off the 2020-2021 academic year with distance learning due to the coronavirus, but the state’s strict vaccination laws still require students be up-to-date on their shots before starting class.

The California Legislature in recent years has passed some of the tightest vaccine mandates in the country to increase the immunization rates in schools. In 2015, lawmakers approved Senate Bill 277 to exclude personal beliefs from the list of reasons parents can skip vaccinating their children.

Last year, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed follow-up measure Senate Bill 276 to increase oversight of doctors who issue five or more medical exemptions in a single year after clusters of unvaccinated children in certain schools were tied to a handful of physicians.

Before students are granted admission, schools are required to review incoming childcare, transitional kindergarten, kindergarten and 7th grade vaccine records.

Despite the pandemic forcing California kids behind a

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Here’s What the Science Actually Says About Kids and COVID-19

Benjamin Knorr, a 40-year-old single father in Janesville, Wisc., says there’s about a 50-50 chance he’ll send his two teenage sons back to school this fall. His 13-year-old, Aiden, would especially like to get back to his friends, sports, and regular life. But Knorr, an independent contractor, has asthma, and fears that his health and finances would be imperiled if one of his boys brought COVID-19 home from school.

“If the numbers go up in Dane County and Rock County, where I work and live, it’s over. We’re just doing the online school,” Knorr says. “We already got through two months of it, and yeah, it was hard. It was stressful. And yeah, it was more work on my part to come home and do the online schooling with them and stuff. But we can’t be homeless.”

As school districts across the United States decide whether to welcome kids back

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In The COVID-19 Era, Kids Sports Won’t Be The Same For A Very Long Time

Up to 45 million kids in the United States participate in some kind of organized sports, and for many of them, that participation is…everything. Sports are fun, they can be good for developing brains and bodies, and they can teach kids about hard work, resiliency and emotional control. 

Unfortunately, youth sports have so far been another casualty of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic — and many families are wondering what comes next. For the high school student who has practiced for decades but won’t get that final season, or the elementary schooler who counts on her teammates as an emotional lifeline, not being able to play is a very, very big deal.  

So HuffPost Parents spoke to several experts about what to expect in the upcoming year, as well as what parents who are weighing resuming their kids’ lessons or putting them back on teams (if that’s an option) should keep

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Your kids could get the coronavirus when they go back to school. These are the risks and benefits to weigh before sending them.

school coronavirus
school coronavirus

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  • Parents are weighing the coronavirus-related risks of sending their kids to school against the education and social losses of keeping them home. 

  • Kids are generally less susceptible to severe illness than adults, but it’s still possible for them to be infected. 

  • Keeping your child home could negatively impact their mental health and delay their social and educational development. 

  • The prevalence of the virus in your community and your school’s plans for controlling the virus also matter. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

This was supposed to be Vanessa Wingerath’s “golden year.” For the first time, her three young children would all be in school, and the Tucson-based doula would have more time to focus on herself and career.  

Then the coronavirus pandemic hit, and sending kids to school was no longer a given. 

Sending only one or two kids to school could topple the family dynamic. Keeping

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How kids and teens are coping with screen time as they learn during COVID quarantine

Since mid-March, when most schools around the U.S. closed due to COVID-19 precautions, kids and teens have had to quickly adapt to learning virtually — which means more sitting and more screen time. Hanging out with friends after class or on weekends became a thing of the past as health officials called for social distancing measures.

The last pandemic occurred over a hundred years ago, well before “screen-time” became a thing. Though the health implications of increased screen time among young people has been studied over the past decade, the effects of more time spent online as a substitute for in-school learning, hasn’t yet been mined.

Doctors in many fields, however, such as physical medicine, psychology and ophthalmology, are already spotting signs and symptoms that could indicate future trends of how increased screen time for virtual learning, combined with a reduction of in-person interaction, is affecting young people’s lives.

Dr.

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