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Here’s the biggest news you missed this weekend

Trump signs executive orders for coronavirus relief

With stimulus talks at an impasse in Congress, President Donald Trump on Saturday signed a series of executive orders to provide temporary relief to Americans suffering from the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic. “We’ve had it,” he said. “We’re going to save American jobs and provide relief to the American worker.”

The four executive orders will …

  • provide an additional $400 per week in unemployment benefits,

  • suspend payments on some student loans through the end of the year,

  • protect renters from being evicted from their homes, and

  • instruct employers to defer certain payroll taxes through the end of the year for Americans who earn less than $100,000 annually. 

But questions remain as to whether Trump has the legal authority to take these actions — or the money to pay for them.

A scramble for unemployment aid

It’s unclear whether Trump has the

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Here’s how parents can protect their kids from coronavirus as schools reopen

Get ready to pack your back-to-school pencils, binders and … hand sanitizer?

While some schools and universities are opting for remote learning or a hybrid of in-person and online sessions, others are pushing ahead with in-person classes – with proper sanitation protocols, of course. Social distancing markings, COVID program coordinators and smaller class sizes are only a few of the reflections of the pandemic-era classroom experience.

But still, parents may be (reasonably) worried about this transition. Although schools will follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidelines to ensure safety for children, it’s always a good idea to reinforce these standards from home as well.

So what can you do, other than clipping a mini-bottle of hand sanitizer to every backpack? USA TODAY asked two health experts for advice on how parents can keep their students safe and healthy as they prepare for in-person classes. 

New clothes and senior

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The race is elite-only this year, but here’s how to start running for 2021

iStock
iStock

The pandemic has put a stop to sporting events across the UK and one of the biggest to be cancelled is the London Marathon.

The event – which would have been its 40th anniversary – was due to be held on Sunday 26 April, but this date was postponed until October 2020. This year’s race will still go ahead on 3 October, but it will now only involve elite athletes, meaning the other 45,000 runners will not be able to take part.

The 2021 marathon has also been moved from its traditional April date to October, in order to give as many runners as possible the chance to partake in the race.

In April, to mark the original date of this year’s marathon, people were encouraged to join in on the 2.6 challenge. The idea was to complete an activity related to the number 26 (as that’s the amount

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Kids’ mental health can struggle during online school. Here’s how teachers are planning ahead.

When her South Carolina high school went online this spring, Maya Green struggled through the same emotions as many of her fellow seniors: She missed her friends. Her online assignments were too easy. She struggled to stay focused.

But Green, 18, also found herself working harder for the teachers who knew her well and cared about her. 

“My school doesn’t do a ton of lessons on social and emotional learning,” said Green, who just graduated from Charleston County School of the Arts, a magnet school, and is headed to Stanford University. “But I grew up in this creative writing program, and I’m really close to my teachers there, and we had at least one purposeful conversation about my emotions after we moved online.”

From the other teachers, Green didn’t hear much to support her mental health.

This was a common complaint among parents when classes went online in March to

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Teen influencer Danielle Cohn spoke openly about her abortion after becoming embroiled in controversy. Here’s how the social media star rose to prominence online.

Danielle Cohn
Danielle Cohn

Danielle Cohn

Albert L. Ortega/Getty Images

  • Influencer and musician Danielle Cohn, who boasts 18.2 million TikTok followers and 1.8 million YouTube subscribers, has become an online sensation thanks to her lip-syncing videos and controversial social media presence.

  • Since the social media star rose to prominence in 2016, fans and critics have speculated about her age and expressed concern about her sexualized social media presence.

  • Cohn made headlines in July when she made a video addressing a leaked audio clip that revealed that she had an abortion earlier this year.

  • Since posting the video, Cohn has received support from fans who “respected” her decision and transparency, but others remained concerned about her age and relationships.

  • Cohn’s mother, Jennifer Archambault, has described the situation as “painful,” and she hopes her daughter can heal out of the spotlight.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Video: Social media influencers adapt to pandemic

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Here’s What the Science Actually Says About Kids and COVID-19

Benjamin Knorr, a 40-year-old single father in Janesville, Wisc., says there’s about a 50-50 chance he’ll send his two teenage sons back to school this fall. His 13-year-old, Aiden, would especially like to get back to his friends, sports, and regular life. But Knorr, an independent contractor, has asthma, and fears that his health and finances would be imperiled if one of his boys brought COVID-19 home from school.

“If the numbers go up in Dane County and Rock County, where I work and live, it’s over. We’re just doing the online school,” Knorr says. “We already got through two months of it, and yeah, it was hard. It was stressful. And yeah, it was more work on my part to come home and do the online schooling with them and stuff. But we can’t be homeless.”

As school districts across the United States decide whether to welcome kids back

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Here’s How to Make Schools Safer for Reopening in the Fall

(Bloomberg Opinion) — During the weekend, the New York Times highlighted some of the comments it has received in reaction to articles about reopening schools. They were not a cause for optimism.

“Despite all my love for my students, I don’t really want to die for them or anyone else. Neither does my partner, who is living with cancer,” a teacher from Minneapolis wrote.

“Of course we need to reopen schools,” said a teacher from Maine, who then asked whether school nurses would be responsible for all the coronavirus testing that would be needed and where the schools would get enough personal protective equipment. “How many teachers receive combat pay while being forced into mortal heroics?” he added.

A parent from Massachusetts: “Does my daughter want to go back to the classroom? Yes. Do I prefer that she does? Yes. Do I want to risk her health in order for

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Homeschool pods are gaining traction amid worries about school reopening; here’s how parents are getting the finances to work

Katrina Mulligan says her decision to organize a homeschooling “pod” – a modern version of a one-room schoolhouse, with a small group of parents splitting the cost of hiring teachers – wasn’t done lightly.

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to spread across the nation, she’s grown increasingly wary about her public school’s plan for getting kids back in the building.

“I don’t think it’s a great idea to send your kids to school in the middle of the pandemic,” says Mulligan, 40. “A lot of us started freaking out.”

Katrina Mulligan and her daughter, November 2019 in Manassas, Virginia.

At the same time, she adds, she and her husband found it difficult this spring to juggle working from home while managing their 6-year-old daughter’s virtual schooling. That experience, plus concerns about school safety, prompted her family to connect with four other families in their hometown of Alexandria, Virginia, to

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Symptoms of COVID-19? Here’s what you can do right now

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Telemedicine claims have surged more than 8000 percent during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo: Getty Images)
Telemedicine claims have surged more than 8000 percent during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo: Getty Images)

Developing symptoms of COVID-19 is understandably terrifying. And, if you don’t have a primary care physician or you’re nervous to go to your doctor’s office or local hospital, it’s hard to know what to do.

That’s where telehealth comes in. Many doctor’s offices have shifted to providing healthcare through video chat or over the phone during the pandemic. For patients who don’t already have a provider, services like Amwell, one of the top telehealth platforms in the country, allow for quick and easy access to a doctor without a long wait time, and it’s relatively inexpensive for those who do

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Can you visit Baja now? Maybe. Here’s what you need to know

A water taxi approaches El Arco, Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, 2015. <span class="copyright">(Christopher Reynolds/Los Angeles Times)</span>
A water taxi approaches El Arco, Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, 2015. (Christopher Reynolds/Los Angeles Times)

Is this the time for a vacation in Baja?

Absolutely not, says California’s governor, backed by legions of local and state health officials who discourage nonessential travel and are alarmed by the continued spread of COVID-19 on both sides of the border.

Yes, say scores of Mexican hoteliers and travel industry workers, desperate for income and eager to explain new safety measures.

Check with the U.S. government, and the answer depends on which agency you ask — and whether you’re driving or flying.

Meanwhile, scores of hotels in Baja California have opened in recent weeks, betting that thousands of Americans are ready to head south. Airlines are adding Baja flights too, even as Canada and much of Europe have banned U.S. tourists, and the U.S. has banned tourists from much of Europe.

Baja California Sur’s

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