Coronavirus

Hoboken Low On Rapid Coronavirus Tests Due To U.S. Shortage: City

HOBOKEN, NJ — Hoboken’s uptown drive-through coronavirus test center is low on rapid tests and is “utilizing non-rapid testing at their site for some patients and reserving rapid tests for those with symptoms or who are at-risk,” the city announced Friday. Typically, Hoboken residents can head to the 15th Street center to get a test, but only some go because they have symptoms, while others do it to ensure they are well before seeing older relatives, or in order to travel to another state with restrictions.

The city said the issue is “due to a nationwide shortage of rapid COVID-19 tests.” As a result, “Riverside [Medical Group] has ordered more rapid tests, however, non-rapid tests may be used for most residents at their site for the near future. We apologize for the inconvenience it may have caused for residents scheduled for testing over the next several days.”

To get a

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Latinos’ health threatened by coronavirus misinformation and distrust

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — When Claudia Guzman suspected she had caught the coronavirus, her friends and family were full of advice: Don’t quarantine. Don’t get tested. A homemade tea will help cure you.

“They were saying, ‘Don’t go to the hospital,’ because supposedly, if you are admitted into the hospital, they administer the virus into your body,” said Guzman, who was born in Chicago to parents from Mexico and now lives in Memphis, Tennessee.

False claims and conspiracy theories, ranging from bogus cures to the idea that the virus is a hoax, have dogged efforts to control the pandemic from the beginning. While bad information about the virus is a problem for everyone, it can pose a particular threat to communities of people of color who already face worse outcomes from the virus.

Among Latinos in the U.S., misinformation around the coronavirus has found fertile ground because many in their communities

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The coronavirus pandemic should force a rethink of higher education

Sara Goldrick-Rab is Professor of Sociology and Medicine and Founding Director of the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice at Temple University. Christine Baker-Smith is Managing Director and Director of Research at the Hope Center.

As the fall season approaches, students and higher education administrators are preparing for a difficult return to college.

With both the coronavirus pandemic and overdue attention to systemic racism confronting the sector, one thing is clear: For many, a new mindset is required to produce positive results for students. 

The American public and a preponderance of legislators think college is still 20 or even 30 years ago. Say “undergraduate” and their minds conjure a rose-colored, movie-constructed utopian scene: Mom and Dad dropping off their son at his new dorm, setting him up to study for a bachelor’s degree fueled by sushi from the dining hall, parties with his friends, perhaps a part-time job at

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2020 Big 10 and Pac-12 College Football Seasons Postponed Due to Coronavirus

Scott Taetsch/Getty Penn State Football

Rising cases and deaths due to the coronavirus pandemic has led to the cancellation of the 2020 Big Ten football season — the latest conference to pull the plug on the collegiate fall sports season.

The Big Ten conference voted on Tuesday to cancel all fall sports, including football, multiple outlets reported. The conference later confirmed the news in a press release.

“In making its decision, which was based on multiple factors, the Big Ten Conference relied on the medical advice and counsel of the Big Ten Task Force for Emerging Infectious Diseases and the Big Ten Sports Medicine Committee,” the press release said.

Morton Schapiro, chair of the Big Ten Council of Presidents/Chancellors and Northwestern University president, said in a statement that “Our primary responsibility is to make the best possible decisions in the interest of our students, faculty and staff.”

The other sports

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How Trump and Biden are trying to run virtual campaigns during coronavirus

President Donald Trump’s campaign has ridiculed rival Democrat Joe Biden for remaining cloistered during the pandemic, forced to give speeches, meet activists and raise money almost entirely from the seclusion of his basement in Wilmington, Delaware.

But as precautions and concerns about COVID-19 have grown, Trump has also halted his signature rallies at least temporarily and started his own virtual gatherings to keep in touch with voters.

“They’re making things up on the fly and seeing what works,” said Bob Oldendick, a political science professor at the University of South Carolina. “You use everything that’s available to you.”

Spikes in COVID-19 cases and social distance measures used to slow the spreading virus have forced the Trump and Biden teams to adjust their campaigns in ways never seen in history. Rallies, handshakes and traditional grassroots organizing are out. They’ve been replaced with a barrage of email, texts, candidate videos, Zoom meetings

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Sobbing over the back-to-school display in the grocery store? It’s the coronavirus blues

School supplies. <span class="copyright">(Laurence Mouton / Getty Images)</span>
School supplies. (Laurence Mouton / Getty Images)

In the grocery store the other day, I passed through the “back to school” aisle and promptly burst into tears.

Not the salty-sweet tears that fill your eyes and hang on your lashes before sending a perfect drop or two down your cheek to remind you that you are still alive in an emotional way. Nope, these were throat-spasming sobs, complete with instant mucus production and primative guttural sounds.

It was … excessive. Especially considering how much I, into the ninth year of my third child’s education, hate back-to-school supply shopping. The possibility of not being forced by tradition into increasing our family’s already prodigious collection of erasers, colored pencils and backpacks is one of the few benefits (besides, you know, avoiding a deadly virus) of the online schooling my 8th-grader faces.

Even so, the sight of spiral notebooks and glue sticks sent

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Here’s how parents can protect their kids from coronavirus as schools reopen

Get ready to pack your back-to-school pencils, binders and … hand sanitizer?

While some schools and universities are opting for remote learning or a hybrid of in-person and online sessions, others are pushing ahead with in-person classes – with proper sanitation protocols, of course. Social distancing markings, COVID program coordinators and smaller class sizes are only a few of the reflections of the pandemic-era classroom experience.

But still, parents may be (reasonably) worried about this transition. Although schools will follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidelines to ensure safety for children, it’s always a good idea to reinforce these standards from home as well.

So what can you do, other than clipping a mini-bottle of hand sanitizer to every backpack? USA TODAY asked two health experts for advice on how parents can keep their students safe and healthy as they prepare for in-person classes. 

New clothes and senior

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Tri-Valley Teens Found Nonprofit, Make Coronavirus Care Packages

DUBLIN, CA — When rising Dublin High School senior Sky Yang founded nonprofit Break the Outbreak in March, he had a website and a vision of outfitting essential workers with protective gear.

“Our operations were small at the time, and we had to finance them on our own,” Yang said in an email interview. “Initially, we faced rejections from many restaurants. But we persevered.”

Months later, Break the Outbreak is in the process of expanding to 28 chapters across 14 states, with more than 200 members, organizers said. Members have created and donated more than 2,000 masks to food industry workers stocking shelves and serving up meals.

Break the Outbreak has a strong East Bay presence with chapters in Dublin, San Ramon, Pleasanton, Livermore and Fremont, but has expanded to cities such as Los Angeles, New York City and Salt Lake City. The nonprofit’s first donation was to Rigatoni’s in

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Teens Found Nonprofit To Make Coronavirus Care Packages

CALIFORNIA — When Sky Yang founded nonprofit Break the Outbreak in March, he had a website and a vision of outfitting essential workers with protective gear.

“Our operations were small at the time, and we had to finance them on our own,” said Yang, a rising senior at Dublin High School in the Bay Area, in an email interview. “Initially, we faced rejections from many restaurants. But we persevered.”

Months later, Break the Outbreak is in the process of expanding to 28 chapters across 14 states, with more than 200 members in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles and elsewhere, organizers said. Members have created and donated more than 2,000 masks to food industry workers stocking shelves and serving up meals.

Break the Outbreak has a strong Bay Area presence, but has expanded in California and across the country, in cities such as New York City and Salt Lake City. The nonprofit’s

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