cases

Gov. DeWine explains testing mess; US surpasses 5 million confirmed cases

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine was bullish on coronavirus tests Sunday despite his own testing hiccup as the U.S. reached another astonishing milestone by surpassing 5 million confirmed cases.

The U.S. is home to about one-quarter of cases reported worldwide. And our numbers continue to roar higher: More than 56,000 new U.S. cases were reported Sunday, with more than 1,000 deaths. More than 162,000 Americans have died in little more than six months.

All this as the world neared 20 million cases, a number experts widely believe is underreported due to insufficient testing. 

President Donald Trump’s decision to unilaterally act on the pandemic-driven recession with executive orders drew scalding criticism from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Sunday. Trump, unable to cut a deal with Congress on a new stimulus package, signed an executive order and issued three memorandums Saturday. One would provide an additional $400 per week in unemployment benefits to

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US on brink of 5 million confirmed cases; Trump executive order may have exceeded authority

The U.S. was on the brink of another historic milestone Sunday, poised to surpass 5 million reported cases of COVID-19 — a number roughly equal to one-quarter of total worldwide cases reported.

The numbers continue to roar higher: More than 56,000 new U.S. cases were reported Sunday, with more than 1,000 deaths. More than 162,000 Americans have died in little more than six months.

The Johns Hopkins University’s coronavirus dashboard also reported record-breaking numbers in Brazil, the second hardest-hit nation in terms of deaths and cases. Brazil has now exceeded 100,000 deaths and 3 million cases. 

All this as the world neared 20 million cases, a number experts widely believe is underreported due to insufficient testing. 

The staggering numbers come as world leaders grapple with the ongoing human and economic toll of the virus. President Donald Trump has previously attributed high number of cases in the U.S. to expanded testing,

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Washington Passes 60,000 Total Coronavirus Cases

SEATTLE, WA — Washington has hit another coronavirus milestone, now officially topping 60,000 cases of the disease. The Washington State Department of Health reported 705 new coronavirus infections Wednesday, as well as five more deaths.

Deaths Wednesday were reported in Grays Harbor, and Spokane County. One death mistakenly assigned to Snohomish County was also moved.

The latest numbers mean a total of 60,084 cases of the coronavirus have been confirmed in the state since the outbreak began, and 1,624 people have died.

Since the crisis began, 51 percent of deaths have been recorded among people aged 80 or older, 38 percent in people age 60 to 79, 9 percent in people age 40 to 59 and 1 percent among people age 20 to 39. Conversely, younger adults make up the bulk of coronavirus cases with 39 percent of cases in patients age 20 to 39.

An issue recording the number

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Dr. Anthony Fauci calls US plateau of cases ‘unacceptable’; Beirut explosion devastates ‘struggling’ health system

Days after President Donald Trump defended his administration’s “incredible” handling of the coronavirus outbreak in a widely viewed interview, the nation’s top health official called the country’s response “disparate” and “not as well suited” to the dynamics of the pandemic.

“What happened when the rubber hit the road on this, and we did get hit, we had the kind of response that was not as well suited to what the dynamics of this outbreak is,” Dr. Anthony Fauci said during a Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health forum Wednesday. “What happened is, we had a bit of a disparate response.”

The country’s response has allowed the daily COVID-19 case count to plateau at an “unacceptable level,” Fauci said, warning that the U.S. will continue to “smolder” without a unified effort to stop the virus. 

Here are some significant developments:

  • A deadly explosion that rocked Lebanon’s capital city of Beirut

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U.S. Cases Rise 1.1%; California Second-Worst Day: Virus Update

(Bloomberg) — California had its second-deadliest day in the pandemic and Florida’s case count topped 500,000. Texas’s test positivity rate reached a three-week high. New York City is setting up checkpoints at key entry areas to enforce state quarantine rules for travelers.

Joe Biden will accept the Democratic Party’s nomination from Delaware rather than risk traveling to Milwaukee. Chicago, the country’s third-largest school district, will have remote learning for public schools when classes resume next month.

Johnson & Johnson will supply 100 million doses of its experimental Covid-19 vaccine to the U.S. The U.K. agreed to invest $18 million in a Scottish vaccine-manufacturing plant, while Moderna Inc. said it has received $400 million of deposits for its potential Covid-19 shot.

Key Developments

Global Tracker: Global cases top 18.6 million; deaths pass 702,000Fauci says testing too slow while Trump says it’s ‘best ever’CDC warns against drinking sanitizer after reports of deathsJapan’s

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Biden won’t go to Milwaukee for convention; Chicago schools to start online; Florida surpasses 500,000 cases

Another pharmaceutical giant announced a vaccine deal with the U.S. on Wednesday while Joe Biden and the rest of the Democratic celebs bid adieu to Milwaukee’s political convention before the coronation train ever rolled into town.

Johnson & Johnson said it has a $1 billion agreement to supply 100 million doses of its vaccine candidate to the U.S. government. Also Wednesday, Moderna said it expects to fully enroll 30,000 people for a trial of its vaccine candidate next month. And a day earlier, Novavax released promising results of an early trial. 

Milwaukee’s 2020 Democratic National Convention suffers the same fate as Charlotte, where plans for a full-blown GOP convention have been whittled down to a few small gatherings later this month.

While the nation waits for a vaccine that could fully reopen schools and businesses, the University of Connecticut became the first top-level college program to cancel its football season.

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Stimulus package deal expected by end of week; US nears 5M cases; Clorox wipes shortage could stretch into 2021

A second round of coronavirus stimulus checks? Maybe.

Top Democrats and negotiators from the White House say a stimulus deal could be reached by the end of the week and approved as early as the following week, That could be good news for tens of millions of unemployed Americans whose $600 weekly boost in unemployment benefits has expired.

“We have to have an agreement, and we will have an agreement,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said.

Novavax Inc., of Gaithersburg, Maryland, became the fifth vaccine developer to release promising results of an early trial. The federal government is paying $1.6 billion to Novavax for 100 million doses.

Here are some significant developments:

  • Democrats, White House optimistic stimulus deal could be reached this week after both sides make concessions.

  • A group of voters backed by Republican lawmakers sued Minnesota state and local officials to try to block a face mask requirement at

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California passes 500,000 cases; 97% of residents on watchlist

California officially surpassed 500,000 total lab-confirmed coronavirus infections and set a new daily high for reported COVID-19 deaths over the weekend, while Sacramento County reached the 10,000-case mark.

The state reported 219 new deaths from the respiratory disease Saturday, another 132 Sunday and 32 Monday to bring the pandemic’s official statewide death toll to 9,388, according to data from the California Department of Public Health.

Sacramento County health officials as of Monday morning had confirmed 145 resident deaths from COVID-19, the disease caused by the highly contagious coronavirus, including 94 residing in the city of Sacramento. Nearly 70 other deaths have been reported in the rest of the greater Sacramento area.

The county suffered at least 65 COVID-19 deaths in July, making it by far the deadliest month of the health crisis. Sacramento County had 34 deaths from the virus occur in April, followed by 18 in each of May

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Who decides when schools close if students, staff contract coronavirus or cases spike locally? Superintendents seek guidance from state

While the state’s plan to leave some school reopening details in the hands of individual districts allows for greater flexibility, it also could leave school administrators having to make tough decisions about how and when to close school buildings if students or staff contract the coronavirus or an individual community becomes immersed in an outbreak.

A number of districts say they want more guidance from the state on how to respond to confirmed infections or spikes in COVID-19 in the wider community. Districts plan to work with local health officials on contract tracing and say they’ll likely send home cohorts of students or close individual schools, but they have not developed benchmarks for those actions, or for opening things back up.

Gov. Ned Lamont Wednesday said the state would “have a strong recommendation that you close those schools” if the rate of positive coronavirus tests reached 10%, but stopped short

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Colleges are increasingly going online for fall 2020 semester as COVID-19 cases rise

Call it coronavirus déjà vu. After planning ways to reopen campuses this fall, colleges are increasingly changing their minds, dramatically increasing online offerings or canceling in-person classes outright.  

This sudden shift will be familiar to students whose spring plans were interrupted by the rapid spread of the coronavirus. Now, COVID-19 cases in much of the country are much higher than in the spring, and rising in many places. 

In many cases, the colleges had released plans for socially distant in-person classes only a few weeks ago, hoping to beat the coronavirus.

“Instead,” said Robert Kelchen, a professor of higher education at Seton Hall University, “the virus beat us.”

Just as in the spring, students have been left scrambling to adjust their class schedules and living arrangements, faced with paying expensive tuition for online classes and rent for an apartment they may not need. Digital classes are still unappealing to many,

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