Try This 60-Second Hack to Make Your Face Mask Fit Better

Photo credit: TikTok
Photo credit: TikTok

From Woman’s Day

Wearing a mask in public is basically the norm these days (or at least, it should be). But let’s be real, surgical masks aren’t perfect. Namely, they can have a loose fit and allow potentially infected particles to get to your nose and mouth.

Well, dentist Olivia Cuid, M.D., has a hack for making surgical masks fit better over your face, and it’s genius. (BTW: This can work for cloth face masks, too.)

Cuid shared the hack in a TikTok that’s already racked up 395,000 views. With a surgical-style mask, “the sides of your face are left very exposed to the outside,” Cuid points out. So, she recommends this trick:

  • Fold your mask in half

  • Tie a knot with the ear loops on each side as close as possible to the mask

  • Open up your mask

  • There will be a little opening on the

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10 women-owned small businesses to support right now

As the economy attempts to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, one of the best ways we can help entrepreneurs stay afloat is by shopping small. This week, the 3rd Hour of TODAY is highlighting women-owned small businesses to consider supporting.

As part of the “She Made It” series, we’ll be featuring some of our favorite brands in fashion, food, beauty and beyond.

Read on for the small brands you should have on your radar right now.

1. Olive & June

While stay-at-home orders were in full force, DIY nail maintenance became a necessity, and Olive & June was perfectly positioned to help customers achieve their at-home manicure goals.

Founded by former equity sales trader Sarah Gibson Tuttle, the business started out as a salon in the Los Angeles area but quickly developed a following for its curated manicure kits and innovative tools to make painting your own nails a little

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Why You Should Never, Ever Stop Taking Antidepressants Cold Turkey

Photo credit: kieferpix - Getty Images
Photo credit: kieferpix – Getty Images

From Prevention

For some people with depression or anxiety, treatment with antidepressants can be a literal lifesaver. But others, depending on any number of reasons—like insurance coverage, unpleasant side effects, or personal preference—may decide to stop taking the drugs.

Teri Biebel, 48, decided to stop venlafaxine (Effexor) with the help of her doctor when she felt like she didn’t need it anymore. “I had severe anxiety, trouble catching my breath, and felt really overwhelmed when I went on Effexor, and it seemed to do the trick,” she says. But 10 years later, “I didn’t feel anxious, I didn’t have depression, I didn’t feel like I needed it.”

But, she says, no one could have prepared her for what it would feel like to stop taking the meds. “It felt like the world’s worst hangover,” she says. “It was painful to lift my head. I

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CDC won’t revise guidelines for opening schools; deaths surge in California, Texas; Trump again blames testing

Federal health guidelines for reopening schools across the nation will not be altered despite complaints from President Donald Trump that they are too difficult and expensive, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday.

Vice President Mike Pence had said Wednesday that the CDC would next week issue “a new set of tools, five different documents that will be giving even more clarity on the guidance going forward.” Documents, yes, new guidelines, no, Redfield told ABC’s “Good Morning America.” He also stressed that guidelines are not requirements.

“Our guidelines are our guidelines, but we are going to provide additional reference documents to basically aid communities in trying to open K-through-12s,” Redfield said. “It’s not a revision of the guidelines.”

Also Thursday, Trump again defended the nation’s booming number of coronavirus cases as a function of testing.

“For the 1/100th time, the reason we show so many

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How the coronavirus is changing the influencer business, according to marketers and top Instagram and YouTube stars

Macy Mariano.
Macy Mariano.

Macy Mariano.

  • Marketers and digital creators are adjusting to rapid changes in the influencer-marketing industry as the coronavirus continues to spread globally.

  • As with most businesses in the ad industry, professionals are trimming budgets, canceling events, and looking for alternative revenue streams.

  • Business Insider spoke with influencer-marketing professionals across the industry to better understand how they are adjusting their businesses to continue to earn a living during the coronavirus pandemic and the resulting economic turmoil. 

  • Subscribe to Business Insider’s influencer newsletter: Influencer Dashboard.

This post will be added to when new information becomes available and was last updated on July 9, 2020.

As the near-term effects of the coronavirus outbreak continue to be felt across the global economy, businesses and creators in the influencer-marketing industry are doing their best to adapt.

Influencers have seen some of their sponsorship deals shut down and events cancelled, with many shifting their

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A visit to the dentist will get expensive. But is it safe to book an appointment during the pandemic?

WASHINGTON: Is it safe to visit the dentist during the COVID-19 pandemic? Dentists can’t eliminate all risk, but they are taking steps to minimize the chances of spreading the coronavirus.

You’ll likely notice changes as soon as you enter the office. Many dentists have removed magazines from waiting rooms, for example, as well as some chairs to encourage social distancing.

They also are spacing out appointments to avoid crowding their offices.

You may be asked to arrive for your appointment with a facial covering and to wait in your car until equipment is cleaned and the dentist is ready. Before receiving care, you can also expect staff to take your temperature and ask about COVID-19 symptoms.

Procedures are changing, too.

Getty Images

Teeth-_640x480_getty

Some dentists are charging for all the extra gear, so ask in advance if you should expect extra costs.

Coronavirus is spread mainly through droplets people spray when

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I did 100 push-ups a day for 100 days in lockdown, and was amazed by how my body changed

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personal essay banner
Day 1 and day 100 of my 100 push-ups a day challenge.
Day 1 and day 100 of my 100 push-ups a day challenge.

Rachel Hosie/Insider

  • Around the start of the UK’s coronavirus lockdown in March, I decided to start doing 100 push-ups a day to maintain my strength and fitness without the gym, and I ultimately decided to complete 100 days.

  • I broke my daily 100 up into sets of 10, done on the hour every hour, but this was a lot harder to stick to at weekends.

  • I started noticing physical change about halfway through, and by the time I completed the challenge last week, I couldn’t believe how much more defined my upper body was looking.

  • The hardest part of the challenge ended up being mental rather than physical, although I have got really good at push-ups now.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Related video: Navy midshipman’s push-up workout while stuck at home

Cast your

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Boris needs to reopen gyms and spas for the health of the nation

Spa mask
Spa mask

Last weekend, the light at the end of the lockdown tunnel shone slightly brighter as the Prime Minister allowed more businesses in England to reopen in a Covid-secure way. Saturday, July 4 – dubbed “Super Saturday” – was the Independence Day the country had been waiting for: a taste of liberty after varying degrees of lockdown. A list that included effective ‘air corridors’ had been published, enabling summer holidays abroad, social distancing was reduced to one metre-plus, pubs poured pints and hairdressers fashioned the latest post-corona barnets.

Major sections of the hospitality and leisure industries reopened in what was the biggest return to freedom since the country went into full-scale lockdown on March 23. For many hotels across England this was excellent news, until the PM’s address on June 23 when he said: “‘Close proximity’ venues such as nightclubs, soft-play areas, indoor gyms, swimming pools, water parks, bowling

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Here’s how small businesses threatened by COVID-19 are surviving the pandemic

With the unemployment rate at 11.1% and businesses shut down in every state, COVID-19 has taken a crippling toll on America’s economic health.

MORE: Small businesses rethink their approach amid the pandemic to serve their customers

For many small businesses, which comprise 47% of private-sector payrolls in the U.S., according to the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council, the sudden economic downturn has created a full-blown crisis.

MORE: When coronavirus hit, these small businesses got creative, but they still need help

The big-picture concern shared by economists is if businesses don’t survive, many Americans won’t have jobs to return to after the pandemic. That’s why experts have said it’s important to support local businesses, which are struggling to generate reliable income.

Now, salons, restaurants, florists and fitness instructors, among others, are creatively adjusting to the new realities of the coronavirus economy, pivoting to bringing parts of their business online, connecting with

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12 Therapist-Backed Tips For Overcoming Exercise Anxiety

“Exercise anxiety is many times created by negative thoughts related to fear of failure, embarrassment and fear of pain or injury,” according to one expert. (Photo: Getty Images/HuffPost)
“Exercise anxiety is many times created by negative thoughts related to fear of failure, embarrassment and fear of pain or injury,” according to one expert. (Photo: Getty Images/HuffPost)

Does the thought of starting a fitness routine or hopping back into an abandoned one incite doom, stress or apprehension? Exercise anxiety is a very real thing.

Raffi Bilek, a licensed therapist and director of the Baltimore Therapy Center, said a common reason that people get nervous about heading to the gym is because of social pressure to look a certain way.

“It’s often an impossible ideal to attain, or at least it certainly seems that way. And that fear of failure can contribute to anxiety over even getting started,” he explained.

Grace Dowd, a licensed clinical social worker in Austin, Texas, added that exercise anxiety can stem from people worrying that others will judge them while they work out, from

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