Medicine

Spain counts losses in tourism from outbreak

MADRID — New statistics in Spain show the coronavirus outbreak cost the country’s key tourism sector more than 15 billion euros ($17 billion) in two months.

Figures published Thursday by Spain’s official statistics agency showed that in May, the number of tourist arrivals was zero. It was the same in April, as Spain closed its borders from mid-March until June 21 to fight the spread of COVID-19.

In April and May last year, 15 million tourists on average spent more than 1,000 euros ($1,130) each.

Tourism is one of Spain’s economic mainstays, and authorities are hoping to salvage some of the summer season by encouraging foreign visitors to come.

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— A predicted surge in U.S. job growth for June might not last

— Closing bars to stop coronavirus spread is backed by science

— Trump says he’ll now wear

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Atlantic City casinos reopen after 108 days

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. — For the first time in 108 days, slot machines will beep, dice will tumble and cards will be dealt at Atlantic City’s casinos as they reopen amid a coronavirus pandemic.

Gamblers will not be allowed to smoke, drink or eat anything inside the casinos. They will have to wear masks while in public areas of the casino, and have their temperatures checked upon entering.

Five of the nine casinos — Hard Rock, Ocean, Resorts, Tropicana and Golden Nugget — will open their doors Thursday morning, the first day New Jersey allows them to.

Three others, Caesars, Bally’s and Harrah’s, will reopen Friday, after allowing their highest rollers a one-day head start on Thursday.

Only the Borgata, the city’s top-performing casino, will remain shut. It quickly decided to scrap its planned reopening after New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy canceled permission for indoor dining in the state, and

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How Joe Rogan Made Trans MMA Fighter Fallon Fox’s Life a Living Hell

Sally Ryan/The New York Times via Redux
Sally Ryan/The New York Times via Redux

Fallon Fox hasn’t forgiven Joe Rogan. She can’t forgive Joe Rogan. Seven years ago, the now-retired Fox became the first mixed martial arts fighter to publicly come out as trans—an act of bravery that was met with a torrent of abuse and groaning bigotry. Not just from Rogan, now an exceedingly wealthy and influential podcaster, but across the sport, including UFC President Dana White, ex-champ turned WWE wrestler Ronda Rousey, her fellow MMA fighters, and the extremely vocal fans who went after her. 

The hostility and prejudice persists to this day. She’d stepped away from social media for a few years, but has started making her voice heard again of late. 

<div class="inline-image__credit"> Twitter </div>

Twitter

Whenever she does so, the harassment rears its ugly head once again, Fox told The Daily Beast. Despite all of her efforts to explain why none of their spittle-flecked insults or

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Houston ICUs Surpass 100% Capacity As Texas Medical Center Makes Beds Available

Intensive care units in one of the world’s largest medical centers are operating at 102% capacity as coronavirus cases surge in Texas, according to a report Wednesday from Texas Medical Center in Houston.

An estimated 36% of the center’s 1,330 ICU beds were occupied by COVID-19 patients. The sprawling medical campus reported that there were 480 current patients with the virus in total.

As the medical center reached capacity, it enacted Phase 2 of a plan to address the surge by making 373 more beds available by reallocating hospital staff and equipment to ICUs in order to take in more patients, the Houston Chronicle reported.

This is the first time that the Houston medical center’s intensive care units have surpassed their capacity since the coronavirus pandemic hit the U.S. The Texas Medical Center campus contains most of Houston’s hospitals, including Baylor College of Medicine, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Memorial Hermann

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American Airlines flights are about to get busier, but will they be safe?

Boarding a flight at Miami International Airport was a breeze March through June, with waiting times at security checkpoints as low as two minutes, mostly empty hallways and half a dozen rows of free seating at many terminals.

But that’s about to change, as American Airlines — the airport’s largest carrier — pushes to satisfy flight demand and fill up the airport.

American Airlines is set to increase its flight schedule by 10 percent in July by reversing its previous policy of keeping half of all economy middle seats empty for social distancing purposes.

Juan Carlos Liscano, the vice president of American Airline’s hub operations in Miami, said the airline is confident that safety measures such as pre-flight COVID questionnaires, contactless check-ins, mandatory face masks, and deep cleans and hospital-standard ventilation in aircraft cabins could make up for the increased capacity on planes.

“One of the things that allows us

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How the nation’s newest doctors are coping with disruptions caused by COVID-19

UCLA medical students make face shields to support doctors caring for COVID-19 patients. <span class="copyright">(Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times)</span>
UCLA medical students make face shields to support doctors caring for COVID-19 patients. (Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times)

July 1 is a big day in medical education. It’s traditionally the day newly minted doctors start their first year of residency. But this year is different. Making the transition from medical school to residency training programs has been complicated by the coronavirus.

“We were all really freaking out,” said Dr. Christine Petrin, who just graduated from medical school at Tulane University in New Orleans and is starting a combined residency in internal medicine and pediatrics at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, D.C.

Fourth-year students learned their residency assignments in March, just as everything was shutting down because of the pandemic. After getting the news of their placements, Petrin said, some of her friends were worried about being able to enter states that were closing their borders. They “just

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Surviving the cycle of people ‘discovering’ anti-black racism

Rex Features
Rex Features

Rianna Walcott has been doing anti-racism work for years. As co-founder of Project Myopia, an initiative that seeks to diversify university curricula, and a black feminist scholar, she has long carried the workload of educating people on racism and anti-blackness in society. But in the last month – since the death of George Floyd and subsequent global Black Lives Matter protests – a time that might seem (from the outside) as a breakthrough for such educators, Walcott has been too drained to engage with the online conversations. It has, in short, been exhausting.

Because Walcott, like many other black people, has seen it all before. “There’s a horrible sense of inevitability that it will end as all have ended and frankly, I’m very wary of how this moment always equates to more work for me,” she tells The Independent. “We know people will notice for a

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5 Upgrades for Safer, Healthier Kids’ Rooms and Nurseries

Photo credit: KatarzynaBialasiewicz - Getty Images
Photo credit: KatarzynaBialasiewicz – Getty Images

From House Beautiful

As technology gives cutting-edge innovations to improve our homes, it’s no surprise that the kids’ category is offering up new and improved products to care for our little ones, too. Whether you’re the sort of parent who’s super aware of your carbon footprint or you’re just looking to brush up on safety standards, here are five easy upgrades—from smarter paint choices to natural-fiber swaps—that will make your kids’ room a healthier place. Get ready to breathe easier—literally!

Paint on a Fresh Coat

If you haven’t already, paint your walls with zero-VOC, organic paint. Not only is it healthier, it can also speed up the decor process: less time waiting for fumes to dry means you can move in faster!

Older homes can leak fumes into the air long after the paint has dried, too. A 2018 study published in the Journal

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Tackling the global demand that’s driving the illegal wildlife trade

Close-up of African elephant with cut tusks to avoid poaching in Etosha National Park, Namibia: Getty Images/iStockphoto
Close-up of African elephant with cut tusks to avoid poaching in Etosha National Park, Namibia: Getty Images/iStockphoto

The global expert who helped draft China’s first animal welfare law has a succinct message for protecting wildlife: “If we don’t buy, they don’t die.”

Grace Ge Gabriel, Regional Director for Asia at the International Fund for Animal Welfare, told The Independent that understanding the driving forces behind the demand for wildlife and their parts was integral to tackling the illegal wildlife trade (IWT).

The Independent’s Stop The Wildlife Trade campaign was launched by its proprietor Evgeny Lebedev to call for an end to high-risk wildlife markets and for an international effort to regulate the illegal trade in wild animals to reduce our risk of future pandemics.

On Wednesday, Ms Gabriel joins the first webinar of The Independent’s campaign to raise awareness around the issue, hosted by non-profit partner Space For Giants’ CEO

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An economist who collected coronavirus data from 841 childcare centers explains how parents should decide whether to send kids back to school

reopening schools
reopening schools

Getty

  • As cities start opening up, parents face the tough decision of whether to send children who’ve been stuck at home for months to daycare, or school. 

  • To help parents with that decision, Emily Oster, an economist, collected coronavirus data from childcare centers that have stayed open during the pandemic. 

  • The data pointed to low transmission rates among both children and staff.

  • Still, Oster acknowledged that the childcare decision is a personal one and that there are “no easy answers.”

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Since the pandemic hit, Emily Oster — an economist who’s authored two books on parenting and pregnancy— has been using available data to respond to families’ pressing concerns about the coronavirus. She’s touched on topics like how to safely visit grandparents and the risks the virus poses in pregnant women.

Lately, Oster’s received an outpouring of questions from parents about whether to

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