Health

Coronavirus surges on Colombia’s Caribbean coast, doctors warn deaths underreported

By Oliver Griffin

BOGOTA (Reuters) – Coronavirus cases and deaths are surging along Colombia’s Caribbean coast as the region becomes the epicenter of the pandemic in the Andean country, with doctors warning many deaths are going undetected.

Colombia – Latin America’s third-most populous nation – has officially reported over 113,000 cases of coronavirus and just under 4,000 deaths among its 50 million inhabitants.

The climbing figures pale in comparison with some neighboring countries, with regional giant Brazil exceeding 64,200 deaths on Saturday.

Colombia’s Caribbean region accounts for close to 40% of the country’s reported cases and just over half its deaths, according to an analysis of government data by the World Health Organization (WHO).

President Ivan Duque told Reuters last month his government was escalating its response to the pandemic in the Caribbean region, given the concentration of cases there, after taking strict measures to slow infection in cities like

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Virus, Floyd death merge in brutal blow to Black well-being

Doctors have known it for a long time, well before the resounding cries of “Black Lives Matter”: Black people suffer disproportionately.

They face countless challenges to good health, among them food, transportation and income. The stress of living with racism has very real, physical effects. And they are especially prone to diabetes, hypertension and other chronic diseases that can be tricky to manage even in normal times.

Then came COVID-19 and George Floyd — one killing Black people in alarming numbers, the other shining a harsh light on systemic racism. In a matter of months and nearly 8 minutes, it became clear that institutions designed to ensure the two most important things in life — health and safety — had converged to turn against one segment of the population in stark, horrific ways.

It’s a brutal blow to Black people’s well-being and renewed calls for racial justice in all realms

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Colleges are racing to create ‘a new sense of normalcy.’ Will new rules, COVID-19 testing be enough?

SAN DIEGO — When students arrive at the University of California San Diego in August, they will find coronavirus testing stations strategically planted throughout campus.

To determine if they’ve been infected, they’ll take a swab, dab it with nasal slime and leave the sample in a collection box. Bar codes with the packets will be linked to their personal medical records and cell phone numbers.

Within a day, students can expect results via text message. For those who test positive, it will set in motion a huge response system that includes medical care, isolation and contact tracing.

Robert Schooley, chief of the infectious diseases division at UC San Diego Health, said the reopening plan, dubbed Return to Learn, has multiple scenarios for campus life and surveillance results will dictate which one administrators deploy. Researchers will even pull manhole covers to check campus sewage for coronavirus levels.

“We want to be

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Revellers clearly unable to social distance say Police, but Health Sec claims majority did ‘right thing’

A car tries to drive along a street filled with revellers drinking in the Soho area of London - JUSTIN TALLIS / AFP
A car tries to drive along a street filled with revellers drinking in the Soho area of London – JUSTIN TALLIS / AFP
Coronavirus Article Bar with counter ..
Coronavirus Article Bar with counter ..

Health Secretary Matt Hancock has said the vast majority of people who went out on ‘Super Saturday’ were “doing the right thing” and following social distancing, despite contradictory reports from the Police Federation.

“I think that from what I’ve seen, although there’s some pictures to the contrary, very, very largely people have acted responsibly,” Mr Hancock told Sky News, adding that he was pleased with how the nation reacted as restrictions were eased on Saturday.

“It was really good to see people out and about and largely, very largely social distancing,” he said.

However, the chairman of the Police Federation has said it was “crystal clear” revellers would not adhere to the one metre plus rule after pubs and restaurants were

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Why Singapore turned to wearable contact-tracing tech

Singapore’s TraceTogether Tokens are the latest effort to tackle Covid-19 with tech. But they have also reignited a privacy debate.

The wearable devices complement the island’s existing contact-tracing app, to identify people who might have been infected by those who have tested positive for the virus.

All users have to do is carry one, and the battery lasts up to nine months without needing a recharge – something one expert said had “stunned” him.

The government agency which developed the devices acknowledges that the Tokens – and technology in general – aren’t “a silver bullet”, but should augment human contact-tracers’ efforts.

The first to receive the devices are thousands of vulnerable elderly people who don’t own smartphones.

To do so, they had to provide their national ID and phone numbers – TraceTogether app users recently had to start doing likewise.

If dongle users test positive for the disease, they have

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Florida Shatters Single-Day Record with Over 11,450 New Coronavirus Cases in Single Day

Florida has once again shattered its single-day record for coronavirus cases, reporting 11,458 new cases of the respiratory illness on Saturday.

The Florida Department of Health has now reported a total of 190,052 confirmed coronavirus cases and 3,702 deaths, the Orlando Sentinel reported. On July 4, there were 18 new fatalities in the state.

Two weeks ago, on June 19, Florida reported 3,822 new cases of coronavirus — the highest single-day number at the time. Still, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has said that the state will not be reeling in its efforts to reopen the economy.

“We’re not going back, closing things,” he said on Wednesday. “I don’t think that that’s really what’s driving it. People going to a business is not what’s driving it. I think when you see the younger folks — I think a lot of it is more just social interactions, so that’s natural.”

EVA MARIE

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2020 graduates face uncertain job market with hope

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – If everything had gone according to plan, Missy Wood thought she’d have a job helping at-risk youths by now. 

Wood, a recent graduate of Middle Tennessee State University, saw her internship with Court-Appointed Special Advocates end abruptly in March as the COVID-19 pandemic took root in Tennessee. She started applying for jobs with the Department of Children’s Services and similar organizations in April.

By the time she graduated in May, new job postings for her chosen career had all but disappeared.

Wood is one of the thousands of graduates across the nation who face a turbulent job market amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. More than 47 million Americans have filed jobless benefit claims since the middle of March, according to the Labor Department.  

Eli Kellum, 7, climbs on the back of babysitter Missy Wood in the Kellum family's backyard in Murfreesboro on June 18, 2020, as the two play on the trampoline. Wood has been looking for work since April but has not been able to find any child-focused social work positions since graduating from MTSU in May. After the pandemic hit, job postings for her planned career seemed to disappear.
Eli Kellum, 7, climbs on the back of babysitter Missy Wood in the Kellum family’s backyard in Murfreesboro on June 18, 2020, as the
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Yoox Net-a-Porter CEO Federico Marchetti, E-Commerce Pioneer, on the State of Shopping

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One business’s loss is another’s gain. When Covid-19 forced brick-and-mortar shops to close their doors this spring, a boom in online sales ensued. As a pioneer of online shopping, Federico Marchetti, CEO and chairman of Yoox Net-a-Porter Group, was well-equipped to navigate the sea change. In 2000, Marchetti founded Yoox, one of the first online-only shopping destinations, and in 2015, he drove a merger with Net-a-Porter to create the e-commerce titan that he leads today.

Marchetti is credited with introducing a number of e-tail practices that are now industry standards—from creating digital flagships for marquee brands to selling high jewelry and watches online. YNAP group—which comprises Yoox, Net-a-Porter, Mr Porter and The Outnet and was acquired by Richemont in 2018—is the e-commerce market leader, with more than 4.3 million customers in 180 countries and one billion visits to its websites annually.

More from

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Airlines end row with government over quarantine rules

Photo: Getty
Photo: Getty

British Airways (IAG.L), easyJet (EZJ.L) and Ryanair (RYAAY) will end a legal challenge against the UK government after it announced certain countries would be exempt from its quarantine rule.

Europe’s top airlines were worried the rule, implemented 8 June, would deter British holidaymakers from travelling, for fear of having to quarantine for 14 days upon return.

All passengers – bar a handful of exemptions – have to fill out an online locator form giving their contact and travel details, as well as the address of where they will isolate.

People who failed to comply were told they could be fined £1,000 ($1248.40) and police were allowed to use “reasonable force” to make sure the rules were followed.

The airlines had taken action against Health Secretary Matt Hancock over measures they said would have a “severe impact on the travel and tourism industry,” which was “already running on fumes.”

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Virus Surges in Arizona, but the Rodeo Goes on

Testing for the coronavirus at a drive-thru testing site in Phoenix, Ariz., on Saturday, June 27, 2020. (Adriana Zehbrauskas/The New York Times)
Testing for the coronavirus at a drive-thru testing site in Phoenix, Ariz., on Saturday, June 27, 2020. (Adriana Zehbrauskas/The New York Times)

PHOENIX — As infections surged through Arizona’s desert landscape this week, word spread that the Round Valley Rodeo, a century-old tradition luring calf ropers, youth riders and big crowds to the mountain town of Springerville, might be called off. The fate of the Fourth of July parade in the nearby hamlet of Eagar seemed in doubt, too, as Gov. Doug Ducey prepared to issue new pandemic guidance.

But Ducey stopped short of ordering a halt to such events, and as of Friday, he had not required Arizonans to wear face coverings in public spaces, as Texas did Thursday. The rodeo and parade will march ahead Saturday as planned, even as infections in the state spiral.

Such is the way fiercely independent Arizona has handled the virus from the

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