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Telehealth called a ‘silver lining’ of the COVID-19 pandemic. This time, it might stick

Telehealth use surged from 8% of Americans in December to 29% in May as primary care, mental health and specialists turned to remote care out of necessity during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a UnitedHealth Group report.

Telehealth evangelists long have touted using high-speed Internet connections and a range of devices to link providers and patients for remote care. But regulatory hurdles and medicine’s conservative culture limited virtual checkups to largely minor conditions like sinus infections or unique circumstances such as connecting neurologists to rural hospitals that lack specialized care.

The pandemic lockdowns closed doctors offices and delayed non-emergency care for millions of Americans. Some clinics scrambled to acquire technology platforms to deliver remote care. Others began employing rarely used video programs to reach patients in their homes.

Remote visits among Medicare patients surged through the end of March, prompting Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Director Seema Verma to

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The Dentist Will See You Now: But Will You See the Dentist?

Mary Lyn Koval did not want to go to the dentist. A marketing communications consultant in upstate New York, Koval works from home and felt she was staying safe during the coronavirus pandemic. One of her childhood fillings had broken, however. “I put off going for two weeks. But I was afraid that if I’d exposed a cavity, it would devolve into a series of root canals” instead of a simple filling replacement, she says. Dental offices were then still closed by state order. Yet urgent and emergency procedures were allowed. Should Koval have chosen to delay treatment and risk a root canal—or worse, a tooth extraction? Or should she have risked exposing herself to COVID-19 at the dentist’s office? These questions are all part of the new pandemic calculus.

All states have now allowed dental practices to resume elective procedures (New York started doing so on June 1). Yet

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USC reverses robust fall reopening plans, asks students to stay home for online classes

USC students are being asked to stay home and continue their education online in the fall amid the coronavirus crisis. <span class="copyright">(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)</span>
USC students are being asked to stay home and continue their education online in the fall amid the coronavirus crisis. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Amid the alarming surge in coronavirus spread, USC announced it will no longer bring all undergraduates back to campus for the fall semester and will move to mainly online classes, reversing an earlier decision to welcome students back for a hybrid model.

The decision, announced by Provost Charles Zukoski late Wednesday night, came the same day Gov. Gavin Newsom announced tougher restrictions on indoor activities. Zukoski recommended that students not return to campus for the semester and instead continue their education online.

“The once-in-a-century COVID-19 pandemic has altered every aspect of our lives — the way we interact, work, and socialize — and with each new permutation of the pandemic, we must find ways to thrive,” Zukoski wrote.

“Given the continuing safety restrictions and

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Does your face mask need a filter? We asked medical experts what to look for

We’re all getting used to wearing face coverings while out and about, and you may have noticed that several masks have a small slot to place a filter for extra protection.

Adding a filter in between the layers of your face mask can help block airborne particles that might sneak through the fabric, and can offer some much need reassurance during these uncertain times.

Luckily, you don’t have to spend a fortune on face mask filters, as there are several budget-friendly options available online. To help you get started, Shop TODAY consulted a few health experts to learn what filter materials are most effective, how often you should swap them out and where you can buy them online.

Why you should use a filter in your face mask

When used in conjunction with social distancing practices, cloth face masks can help slow the spread of coronavirus. However, not all masks

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How to get it fixed in lockdown

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Specialized Sirrus Stop Ride

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Specialized Sirrus Stop Ride

Following the recent Specialized Sirrus stop-ride notice, the American brand has released its next-step instructions for owners, announcing an official recall to the affected models. 

In a letter from Jon Goulet, Director of Quality, Specialized announced that it is “conducting a voluntary recall of these bikes so that we can reinstall the cranks correctly and make sure they are safe to ride.”

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This means that owners will need to take their Sirrus or Sirrus X bike to an authorised Specialized retailer – at no cost – in order to have the repair carried out. The letter goes on to

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How to treat head lice effectively with combs and medication

You can get rid of lice with combs, shampoos, creams, or medication.
You can get rid of lice with combs, shampoos, creams, or medication.

Eric Audras/Getty Images

  • To treat head lice, you can physically remove the lice with a special comb for lice treatment. 

  • While combing is effective, it can also be time-consuming, and other medications may also help you get rid of lice fast.

  • For example, there are specific shampoos, topical creams, and oral medications that can also help you treat head lice. 

  • This article was medically reviewed by Sharleen St. Surin-Lord, MD, a board-certified dermatologist at Visage Dermatology and assistant professor of dermatology at Howard University.

  • This story is part of Insider’s complete guide to Bug Bites. 

Head lice can quickly spread through a school, family, or group of friends. Though irritating, lice isn’t harmful to your health, and fortunately, it’s treatable with the right combs, topical treatments, and medications. 

Here’s what you need to know to treat lice effectively. 

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Dearfoams Launches Everyday Hero Sweepstakes, Ben Sherman Donates Masks to Health Care Workers + More

Click here to read the full article.

July 2, 2020: Dearfoams is continuing its celebration of everyday heroes with today’s launch of “Nominate a Hero” — a sweepstakes that invites consumers to nominate a hero of the choice on Dearfoams.com for the chance to surprise them with a free pair of slippers. Nominations, which run through July 15, can include anyone from health-care workers to military service members, parents, teachers, store clerks, and more. According to the company, 200 winning heroes will be selected at random.  “We are so thrilled to continue our heroes’ campaign and commitment to our community by honoring and celebrating all of the heroes in our lives with the new limited-edition Hero Bear capsule collection,” said Tricia Bouras, president of Dearfoams. “We have been so inspired by the overwhelming response the campaign has received these past few months and want to continue honoring those individuals who

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Child activity levels plunging, warn schools, as PE funding campaign gathers pace

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Activity levels amongst children have “significantly dropped” in the latter stages of lockdown, headteachers have warned, as the Government comes under renewed pressure to guarantee primary school sport funding.

Christine Ohuruogu, the former Olympic, World and Commonwealth 400m champion, and Nicky Butt, the ex-Manchester United and England midfielder, have also added their support to an open letter calling for Prime Minister Boris Johnson to help.

Concern centres on the £320 million PE and Sport Premium, which is largely funded by the Sugar Tax, and which the Government has so far refused to guarantee from the next academic year in September.

The Government is expected to respond to the campaign by the end of the week, prompting primary schools across the UK to lay bare a potential crisis in

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Restaurants face high fees from delivery apps. Uber buying Postmates will make it worse.

Restaurants face high fees from delivery apps. Uber buying Postmates will make it worse.
Restaurants face high fees from delivery apps. Uber buying Postmates will make it worse.

Nobu Shiozawa is determined to get customers his restaurant’s homemade tofu and sushi without using delivery apps such as Uber Eats, Grubhub, DoorDash, and Postmates.

That’s not easy these days. Thanks to COVID-19, New York City banned restaurant dining in March. So Shiozawa, who owns and manages in New York City, uses his own small crew to avoid high commissions from the apps, usually .

“If I start using the food delivery service providers during the pandemic, the number of orders and the amount of sales would be increased,” he admitted.

But then he would have to hire more workers to handle the extra orders, which was hard for him to justify with the high fees and the fact he cut more than 60 percent of his staff after the pandemic started.

Image: Nobu Shiozawa

Image:

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‘Anti-maskers’ say medical conditions prevent them from wearing masks, but doctors say that’s not a legitimate excuse

medical coronavirus flu virus nyc street face mask gloves covid19 stores shut down closed restaurants social distancing delivery cox 14
medical coronavirus flu virus nyc street face mask gloves covid19 stores shut down closed restaurants social distancing delivery cox 14

Crystal Cox/Business Insider

  • Some people are claiming they’re “exempt” from mask wearing due to medical conditions they won’t disclose, according to one doctor on Twitter

  • Doctors say that even people with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease should wear masks in public, and that there are ways to make the practice safer and more comfortable. 

  • Other arguments against wearing masks have been more about politics and choice than health conditions. 

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Face masks are currently recommended, if not required, in many public settings throughout the US in order to can help protect wearers from contracting or spreading the novel coronavirus. 

That’s because they work. A recent study out of the UK, for example, showed that mandates to wear masks could be enough to

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