Month: September 2020

Westbrook HS switches to distance learning through Wednesday after coronavirus case


WESTBROOK — Westbrook High School will be closed through Wednesday after a member of the school community tested positive for the coronavirus, according to a letter from the district.

In the letter, Zachary Faiella, director of health in Westbrook, and Interim Superintendent Patricia Charles said they became aware of the positive test on Sunday afternoon.

“The Westbrook Health Director, Zachary Faiella, has determined that the Westbrook High School facility needs to be closed for three days, September 14, 15, and 16,.” the officials said in the release. “These three days will enable the school to be thoroughly cleaned and to conduct the necessary contact tracing. The students will participate in distance learning during this period.”




“Pending further information on this investigation, students and staff who have not been identified as either being close contacts or in the same class

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Apple’s Connectivity, Fitness And Services

No iPhone 12 – but pretty much everything else.

The question for Apple is: Will the slew of offerings announced this week be enough to bring new users into its ever-expanding ecosystem, and also keep current consumers, well, consuming?

On Tuesday (Sept. 15), Apple unveiled a slew of watches and services in a bid to give a tailwind to hardware sales and boost its services business.

We saw announcements tied to the Apple Watch Series 6, the Apple Watch SE, bundles tied to Apple One and the Apple Fitness+.

At a high level, the Apple event underscored the convergence of devices and a wide range of services to be consumed over those devices – centering in this case on health, music and connectivity in general (and some operating system updates).

Perhaps no surprise, in the age of the pandemic, is the health pitch. 

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Basking Ridge: RX Drive-Thru Medicine Drop-Off Saturday, Sept. 12

Sept. 11, 2020

BRANCHBURG, NJ – Residents can safely dispose of their unwanted and outdated over-the-counter and prescription medication at the next Rx Mission Drive-in/Drop-Off. The event is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 12, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Branchburg Public Works Garage, located at 34 Kenbury Road, Branchburg, NJ 08876. To occur rain or shine.

Medication should be in its original package with the name of the medication visible, but personal information should be removed so that the person’s name and address are not visible. Illegal drugs, needles and sharps should not be brought to the drop-off.

“The focus of this program is to protect the environment and get rid of unwanted, unused and outdated medicine, especially potentially dangerous pharmaceuticals,” said Somerset County Sheriff Darrin Russo. “For nearly 10 years, county residents have shown support for the drop-off program, and our communities are safer because of their

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Dentist gets jail for extracting a tooth while standing on a hoverboard



a man and a woman looking at the camera


© Provided by The Independent


A dentist has been sentenced to 12 years in prison for nearly 50 charges including reckless endangerment and unlawful dental acts, after he filmed himself extracting a patient’s tooth while on a hoverboard.

Seth Lookhart, from Anchorage, Alaska, was found guilty by a jury in January on 46 charges including Medicaid fraud, embezzlement, reckless endangerment and unlawful dental acts.

Anchorage Superior Court Judge Michael Wolverton said on Monday that Lookhart put multiple people’s lives at risk by sedating them for extended periods of time.

Mr Wolverton said: “In reviewing all this over and over again, I have a visceral response – you darn near killed some people.”

According to local newspaper, Anchorage Daily News, a former employee told investigators in 2017, when charges were filed against Lookhart, that the dentist was performing more intravenous sedation on his patients than necessary to boost his profits.

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Italy’s Silvio Berlusconi leaves hospital after virus scare [Video]

SHOTLIST

MILAN, LOMBARDY, ITALYSEPTEMBER 14, 2020SOURCE: AFPTV

1. Wide shot Silvio Berlusconi exits Pavilion D of San Raffaele Hospital accompanied by security men and Dr. Alberto Zangrillo, head of the Intensive Care Unit

2. SOUNDBITE 1 – Silvio Berlusconi, Former Italian premier (male, Italian, 26 sec): “It was a difficult test. I say this with emotion. Thank goodness and thanks to the professionalism of the doctors of San Raffaele Hospital, first of all Professor Alberto Zangrillo and his collaborators, I passed what I consider perhaps the most difficult ordeal of my life.”

3. Mid shot the end of the press conference Silvio Berlusconi puts his mask back on and greets the journalists

///———————————————————–AFP TEXT STORY:

Italy’s Berlusconi leaves hospital after virus scare

=(Picture+Video)=

Milan, Sept 14, 2020 (AFP) – Former Italian premier Silvio Berlusconi left hospital Monday 11 days after being admitted with coronavirus, describing it as “perhaps the most

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Buy an Apple Watch from Best Buy, get 6 months of Apple Fitness Plus free

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Apple

As part of yesterday’s Apple event, the company introduced not only two new Apple Watches, but also a brand-new fitness subscription service: Fitness Plus. It will cost $9.99 a month or $79 a year, but if you buy a new watch from Apple, you’ll get three months free.

Best Buy: “We’ll see your three months and raise you three months.” For a limited time, any Apple Watch purchase from Best Buy includes a free 6-month Fitness Plus subscription — a $60 value.

A couple things to note: First, although the new Apple Watch Series 6 isn’t yet listed on that page, it’s available for preorder. So is the Apple Watch SE.

Second, although Fitness Plus isn’t yet available, you’ll be able to redeem the offer later this year when the service launches.

This deal applies

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Penn Medicine researcher receives early career honor from Burroughs Wellcome Fund

PHILADELPHIA — Golnaz Vahedi, PhD, an assistant professor of Genetics in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has received the Investigators in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease (PATH) award from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, an independent foundation based in Research Triangle Park, NC dedicated to advancing the biomedical sciences. Dr. Vahedi is one of 9 recipients selected from 157 nominees nationwide.

Under the grant, Dr. Vahedi will work to uncover how lentiviruses change the linear and three-dimensional organization of the host genome, findings which could pave the way to understand how HIV persistence occurs.

Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has dramatically reduced morbidity and mortality for people living with HIV by effectively suppressing viral replication to undetectable levels in plasma. However, ART does not eradicate HIV. The major obstacle to cure HIV is that the virus establishes stable reservoirs of persistently-infected cells. Exactly how HIV can evade immune

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Yes, it’s safe to go to the dentist

  • There has been no evidence of coronavirus transmission in dental offices since many reopened in May.
  • Dentists have universal precautions in place to prevent the transmission of any infectious disease.
  • Oral health has a cascading effect on overall health, so it’s important to keep up with your cleanings and preventive dental care.

Some people might be hesitant to visit the dentist during the coronavirus pandemic, especially after the World Health Organization suggested not to in an August announcement.

However, it’s actually a low-risk activity for the patient, said Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease expert at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security.

“I would be more worried about my dentist than I would myself contracting the virus there,” Adalja told Insider.

Dentists aren’t too concerned either. After the WHO’s recommendation to delay routine dental care in certain situations due to COVID-19, the American Dental Association released a statement saying

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Gilead CEO Daniel O’Day on ways to use remdesivir to treat coronavirus

Gilead Sciences CEO Daniel O’Day told CNBC on Monday that the company is continuing to study new ways to use its coronavirus treatment remdesivir on patients, including potentially outside of the hospital all together. 

“We’re not finished with remdesivir,” O’Day said on “Squawk Box,” one day after the biopharmaceutical company announced a $21 billion acquisition of Immunomedics that will enhance Gilead’s availability of cancer treatments. 

Gilead in May received emergency approval for remdesivir from the Food and Drug Administration, allowing it to be used on people who were severely ill with Covid-19 in the hospital. The antiviral drug, which is administered through an intravenous infusion has been shown to help shorten the recovery time of some hospitalized patients.

Reuters reported last week that some large hospital systems in the U.S. are limiting their use of remdesivir to severely ill people. In late August, the FDA expanded its emergency authorization to

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These immunocompromised college students felt isolated when the fall semester began. So they did something about it

On the list of proposed topics: “Have you had a hard time with friends in the pandemic?”, “Are you planning to go back to school in the fall?” and “How have you been coping on a day-to-day basis?”

But Lynch quickly realized that the group of immunocompromised college students didn’t need questions to guide them. They just wanted to talk about their shared feeling of isolation during the pandemic.

They bonded over the fact that people assume that all teens are healthy. They questioned whether their schools were taking the right measures to help those who are more at-risk. They vented about their friends not understanding their inability to leave the house without fear of contracting Covid.

It’s a virtual support group for immunocompromised students — but its members don’t call it that. They prefer the name “Chronic and Iconic.”

They're living with an invisible illness. Social distancing will save their lives

It all started with a social media post. Lynch, who

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