Day: August 13, 2020

An old, dangerous drug has made a comeback with a new generation of users

It had been several years since professor Joseph Palamar had seen that unmistakable “caveman face,” the telltale sign of an imminent overdose of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid, or GHB.

Standing among throngs of concertgoers at a Brooklyn music venue last year, Palamar spotted the bulky man with the contorted face nearby. He was struggling to remain conscious.

“I’ve noticed that when people are meant to pass out and they keep forcing it, they make these very strange, primitive faces,” Palamar, an epidemiologist and associate professor of population health at New York University’s Grossman School of Medicine, told NBC News. “They look like they are in such euphoria it’s almost painful.”

Within minutes, the man succumbed, apparently to the suppressive effects of the drug, and collapsed to the floor. Security staff raced over and carried him away.

Related: When the California senator first entered elected office in San Francisco in 2004, she represented

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What Will College Look Like in Fall 2020?

From Seventeen

Any other year, incoming college freshmen would be filled with giddy anticipation at this very moment, counting down the weeks until they get to step on to their awaiting campus. They’d be making a packing list, trying to decide whether or not their beloved stuffed animal should make the journey to their dorm room or stay behind with their high school years. They’d be awkwardly chatting with their future roommates, comparing sleep schedules, asking about majors, and subtly trying to figure each other out.

While some 17 and 18-year-olds are doing that right now, many are not. Instead, they’re getting ready to buckle down for another semester of Zoom classes. They’re trying to imagine living under their parent’s roof for the next few months, instead of on the dorm floor like they planned. This semester, the coronavirus pandemic is forcing hundreds of thousands of college students to stay

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The FHSAA will finally decide its fall sports plan. A look at all options on the table

The Florida High School Athletic Association’s Board of Directors is finally set to vote — this time for real — on the association’s plan for playing fall sports this year amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Board of Directors is slated to meet in person at 10 a.m. on Friday in Gainesville to finalize a plan for all fall sports, including football. There are three options currently on the table, with potential regular-season start dates ranging from early September to November.

As it currently stands, the FHSAA will allow schools to begin practicing for fall sports on Aug. 24 and let the regular seasons begin two weeks later in September. One of the options — “Option 1” — mostly keeps this plan intact, while actually moving up the start of the regular season a few days. The other two — “Option 3A” and “Option 3B” — call for the FHSAA to

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South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem among influential Women of the Century from Mount Rushmore State

It takes a strong person to live in South Dakota.

The harsh winters, the isolation of rural parts of the state, and the uncertainty of relying on Mother Nature to provide a livelihood in agriculture are all reasons some may choose to avoid living in the Mount Rushmore State. 

But for those who live here, there’s beauty in the prairie, in the Black Hills, in the serenity of a cold winter day. There’s also ample opportunity to make an impact on the community, and from the state’s inception, South Dakota women have been making their mark.

In August, America marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, when women gained the legal right to vote. In commemoration of the occasion, the USA TODAY Network is naming 10 American women from all 50 states and the District of Columbia who’ve made significant contributions to their respective states and country as Women

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Deepfakes Are Amazing. They’re Also Terrifying for Our Future.

Photo credit: Ctrl Shift Face/YouTube
Photo credit: Ctrl Shift Face/YouTube

From Popular Mechanics

Imagine this: You click on a news clip and see the President of the United States at a press conference with a foreign leader. The dialogue is real. The news conference is real. You share with a friend. They share with a friend. Soon, everyone has seen it. Only later you learn that the President’s head was superimposed on someone else’s body. None of it ever actually happened.

Sound farfetched? Not if you’ve seen a certain wild video from YouTube user Ctrl Shift Face (take a look at the clip above). Since last August, it’s gotten almost 9.5 million views.

🌍 Our world is weird. Let’s navigate it together. 🌍

In it, comedian Bill Hader shares a story about his encounters with Tom Cruise and Seth Rogen. As Hader, a skilled impressionist, does his best Cruise and Rogen, those actors’ faces seamlessly,

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Fauci says temperature checks not reliable

Over 20.7 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks.

Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 5.2 million diagnosed cases and at least 166,623 deaths.

Fauci says temperature checks not reliable for screening Florida tops 9,000 deaths Newborn among Minnesota children recently hospitalized

Here’s how the news is developing. All times Eastern. Please refresh this page for updates.

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp said Thursday that he’s withdrawing his lawsuit against Atlanta’s City Council and Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance … Read More

TikTok and its employees prepare to fight Trump over app ban

TikTok and its U.S. employees are planning to take President Donald Trump’s administration to court over his sweeping order to ban the popular video app, according to a lawyer preparing one of the lawsuits.

The employees’ legal challenge to Trump’s executive order will be separate from a pending lawsuit from the company that owns the app, though both will argue that the order is unconstitutional, said Mike Godwin, an internet policy lawyer representing the employees.

Trump last week ordered sweeping but vague bans on dealings with the Chinese owners of TikTok and messaging app WeChat, saying they are a threat to U.S. national security, foreign policy and the economy. The TikTok order would take effect in September, but it remains unclear what it will mean for the apps’ 100 million U.S. users, many of them teenagers or young adults who use it to post and watch short-form videos.

It’s also

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The coronavirus pandemic should force a rethink of higher education

Sara Goldrick-Rab is Professor of Sociology and Medicine and Founding Director of the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice at Temple University. Christine Baker-Smith is Managing Director and Director of Research at the Hope Center.

As the fall season approaches, students and higher education administrators are preparing for a difficult return to college.

With both the coronavirus pandemic and overdue attention to systemic racism confronting the sector, one thing is clear: For many, a new mindset is required to produce positive results for students. 

The American public and a preponderance of legislators think college is still 20 or even 30 years ago. Say “undergraduate” and their minds conjure a rose-colored, movie-constructed utopian scene: Mom and Dad dropping off their son at his new dorm, setting him up to study for a bachelor’s degree fueled by sushi from the dining hall, parties with his friends, perhaps a part-time job at

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Newborn among Minnesota children recently hospitalized

Over 20.6 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks.

Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 5.2 million diagnosed cases and at least 166,148 deaths.

At least 561 inmates test positive at Florida prison New Zealand reports 13 more locally-transmitted cases Newborn baby among Minnesota children recently hospitalized

Here’s how the news is developing. All times Eastern. Please refresh this page for updates.

Many Catholic schools across the country are already up and running, and by the end … Read More

50+ Black-Owned Businesses to Shop Now and Forever

Photo credit: Courtesy of Brands
Photo credit: Courtesy of Brands

From Good Housekeeping

Buying from Black-owned shops, stores and brands is one of the many ways to be an ally and show support to a community that has been deeply affected by systemic racism. Not only are Black business owners turned down for loans twice as often as their white counterparts, but they have also been hit the hardest by the coronavirus pandemic. Your money can make a difference, especially when you continuously choose to buy Black for everyday lifestyle staples like makeup, clothes, food, and more.

A simple Google search will direct you to Black-owned businesses within your community, but we’ve also compiled a list of brands that Good Housekeeping editors and Good Housekeeping Institute product analysts personally love that you can shop online right now in honor of National Black Business Month. Our hope is that you’ll find some new favorite products here

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