Day: August 12, 2020

Avoid dental cleanings and other routine visits to the dentist for now

You should delay your routine dental cleaning until the coronavirus pandemic eases, according to new guidance from the World Health Organization. Dentists, hygienists, and other oral care providers have a heightened risk of contracting COVID-19 and passing it to patients because “they are in close contact with their patients’ mouths, use spray-generating equipment that produces airborne particles, [and] are exposed to saliva, blood and body fluids,” WHO said.

“WHO advises that routine non-essential oral health care—such as check-ups, dental cleanings, and preventive care—be delayed until there has been sufficient reduction in COVID-19 transmission rates,” the U.N. agency said.

Almost three-quarters of countries surveyed said that the coronavirus pandemic has disrupted dental services—higher than for any other type of essential service,

Read More

Joe Biden And Kamala Harris Make First Remarks As Historic Democratic Ticket

Joe Biden and California Sen. Kamala Harris appeared together for the first time as a joint Democratic ticket Wednesday in Wilmington, Delaware, with a clear general election message: President Donald Trump is a purveyor of crisis.

“America is crying out for leadership, yet we have a president who cares more about himself than the people who elected him,” Harris said after being introduced by Biden. “A president who is making every challenge we face even more difficult to solve.”

The event, held in a high school gymnasium, was only attended by press and staff, as well as Biden’s and Harris’ spouses, Dr. Jill Biden and Doug Emhoff, due to social distancing protocols during the pandemic. Speeches that would typically be met with big fanfare and applause were delivered in a silent room, and livestreamed to a virtual audience. Biden and Harris did not shake hands and for the most part

Read More

Mask altercations can turn violent. Here’s how to de-escalate them safely

It was a video seen around the world: On July 29, a woman using a cane was left hospitalized with a broken knee after she was thrown to the ground during an altercation over masks in a New Jersey Staples store.

Margot Kagan, who has been diagnosed with liver cancer and liver failure, received a life-saving organ transplant back in March. Her condition leaves her vulnerable to severe illness if she contracts COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus.

“Because of my transplant, I’m on immunosuppressants,” Kagan told TODAY by phone. “I was literally told when I left the hospital that if I get COVID-19, I’d be back in the hospital and I’d probably die.”

While she was using a fax machine at Staples in Hackensack, Kagan said she noticed a woman at the machine across from her was wearing her mask below her mouth. (The Centers for Disease

Read More

A TODAY All Day town hall

The upcoming school year is going to look and feel different from any other. While the shifts have been necessary because of COVID, we can’t ignore how these changes will affect the mental health of children or their parents, whether kids are learning remotely or in person.

Jenna Bush Hager spoke to a panel of mental health professionals on TODAY All Day, the TODAY show’s streaming channel, for a special hour-long town hall, “Coronavirus and the Classroom,” a collaboration with Common Sense.

Related: Craig Melvin sat with experts to answer viewer questions about school safety.

Watch TODAY All Day: Get the best news, information and inspiration from TODAY, all day long.

Answering questions about children’s development and mental health were Dr. Stephanie Lee, a clinical psychologist with the Child Mind Institute, Dr. Allison Kanter Agliata, a psychologist and former head of middle school in Tampa Florida, and Tom Kerstin, a

Read More

Biden, Harris make unusual campaign debut in virus era

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — Joe Biden is making his first appearance with newly chosen running mate Kamala Harris on Wednesday, betting that the California senator’s historic profile and confrontational style against President Donald Trump will boost Democrats’ efforts to oust the Republican president amid cascading national crises.

The former primary rivals will appear at a high school in Biden’s Delaware hometown to discuss their shared vision for how to defeat Trump and then lead the country through a pandemic, its economic fallout and a long-simmering reckoning with racism. Harris and Biden then will sit down together for an online fundraiser designed to let small donors get a fresh glimpse of what the Democratic presidential ticket will look like together.

In a reflection of coronavirus guidelines, there will be no adoring throngs that would greet a new running mate in a routine campaign and certainly one with Harris’ historical significance. The

Read More

Thinking about going to the dentist? Experts say it’s OK in areas of low COVID-19 transmission

The World Health Organization (WHO) has taken a strong stance on oral health, urging people to put off routine visits to the dentist when COVID-19 is heavily circulating in their area.

In interim guidance published on Aug. 3, the WHO specifically advises that “routine non-essential oral health care — which usually includes oral health check-ups, dental cleanings and preventive care — be delayed until there has been sufficient reduction in COVID-19 transmission rates from community transmission to cluster cases or according to official recommendations at national, sub-national, or local level.” This recommendation also applies to “aesthetic dental treatments,” the guidance says. However, the organization adds, urgent or emergency care visits “that are vital for preserving a person’s oral functioning, managing severe pain, or securing quality of life should be provided.”

The CDC advises dentists to “prioritize the most critical dental services and provide care in a way that minimizes harm to patients from delaying care and harm to personnel and patients from potential exposure” to COVID-19. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz/MediaNews Group/Pasadena Star-News via Getty Images)
The CDC advises dentists to “prioritize the most critical dental services and provide care in a way that minimizes harm
Read More

Try this simple hack to make a surgical face mask fit better

Surgical face masks appear to be one of the best ways to stop the spread of respiratory droplets. They can also be problematic when it comes to a snug fit, with wearers often noticing gaps on the side of their faces.

Enter a simple hack to improve the fit.

Two viral videos from two dentists demonstrating the same technique during the coronavirus pandemic have received millions of views online.

Dr. Olivia Cui, a dentist in suburban Calgary, Alberta, posted her tutorial on TikTok:

Dr. Rabeeh Bahrampourian, a dentist New South Wales, Australia, showed the hack on YouTube:

Here’s what you need to do:

  • Start with clean hands — always wash them before handling a new mask (and after taking off a used one).

  • Fold the mask in half, lengthwise, so that the bottom and top strip are edge-to-edge.

  • Take one ear loop and make a knot as close as possible

Read More

A Week At A University In Detroit, MI, That Costs $30,000 A Year

Welcome to Money Diaries College Edition where we are tackling the ever-present taboo that is money. We’re asking real people how they spend their hard-earned money during a seven-day period — and we’re tracking every last dollar.

Today: a public health major at a university that costs $30,000 per year who spends some of her money this week on a cupcake.

Major: Public Health with Pre-Med
Age: 21
Location: Detroit, MI
University Size: 25,000
Yearly Tuition Cost: $30,000 (I am on a full merit scholarship that covers my tuition, housing, and meal plan)
Current Student Loan Total: $0
Salary/Allowance: I work as an MCAT tutor, which pays $25 an hour (I work three hours a week) and as a peer mentor for my university, which pays $10 an hour (our hours were reduced to 10 hours/week due to COVID)
Paycheck Amount (Every two weeks): $275
Pronouns: She/her

Monthly ExpensesRead More

Biden, Harris to make unusual campaign debut in virus era

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — Joe Biden is making his first appearance with newly chosen running mate Kamala Harris on Wednesday, betting that the California senator’s historic profile and confrontational style against President Donald Trump will boost Democrats’ efforts to oust the Republican president amid cascading national crises.

The former primary rivals will appear at a high school in Biden’s Delaware hometown to discuss their shared vision for how to defeat Trump and then lead the country through a pandemic, its economic fallout and a long-simmering reckoning with racism. Harris and Biden then will sit down together for an online fundraiser designed to let small donors get a fresh glimpse of what the Democratic presidential ticket will look like together.

In a reflection of coronavirus guidelines, there will be no adoring throngs that would greet a new running mate in a routine campaign and certainly one with Harris’ historical significance. The

Read More

Our Covid cohort of students will need more mental health support than ever

student looking at books - Getty Images
student looking at books – Getty Images

Going to university is a time of great transition. And while those first moments at university can be very exciting, transitions are also times when young people face an increased risk of mental health difficulties. We also know that the years between 16 and 25 are when people are most likely to experience mental health difficulties for the first time.  

Students have always experienced pressures, such as worries about their finances, including housing costs and managing the cost of living. They also need to get used to a different type of learning than at school. 

Plus, they are also leaving behind all their existing social support, the teachers, friends and family that are typically protective for young people’s mental health. 

There are specific points in students’ lives when there can be additional pressures. These might occur a few weeks into term when people

Read More