Day: August 9, 2020

Disney World to Cut Theme Park Hours Due to Lower-Than-Expected Attendance amid COVID-19 Pandemic

Disney World will be reducing their operating hours in September amid lower-than-expected attendance due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

The Florida theme park shared its revised hours on the Disney World website over the weekend.

The Magic Kingdom and Hollywood Studios are both losing an hour of operation at the end of the day. Meanwhile, Epcot is cutting back by two hours and the Animal Kingdom is losing an hour in the morning and an hour at the end of the day.

RELATED: Splash Mountain Log Flume at Disney World Sinks Under Water During Ride in Viral Video

Disney World’s new hours set to begin on Sept. 8 are:

Magic Kingdom: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Epcot: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Hollywood Studios: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Animal Kingdom: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Disney World officially reopened on July 11 after shutting down all operations in mid-March

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Here’s the biggest news you missed this weekend

Trump signs executive orders for coronavirus relief

With stimulus talks at an impasse in Congress, President Donald Trump on Saturday signed a series of executive orders to provide temporary relief to Americans suffering from the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic. “We’ve had it,” he said. “We’re going to save American jobs and provide relief to the American worker.”

The four executive orders will …

  • provide an additional $400 per week in unemployment benefits,

  • suspend payments on some student loans through the end of the year,

  • protect renters from being evicted from their homes, and

  • instruct employers to defer certain payroll taxes through the end of the year for Americans who earn less than $100,000 annually. 

But questions remain as to whether Trump has the legal authority to take these actions — or the money to pay for them.

A scramble for unemployment aid

It’s unclear whether Trump has the

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Joe Biden and Democrats unveil details of DNC convention including nightly themes, ways to watch

WASHINGTON – With guests and segments streamed in from across the country, Democrats and their presumptive nominee Joe Biden plan to use four nights of videos and speakers at the party’s convention to highlight stories of everyday Americans struggling during a global pandemic and economic upheaval. 

In doing so, they will cast blame on President Donald Trump for simultaneous crises and argue that Biden, the former vice president, is the person America needs to lead the nation out of chaos.

Biden and the Democratic National Committee have chosen “Uniting America,” according to convention planners, as the primary theme for the four-day day Democratic National Convention, originally planned for Milwaukee but now to be conducted by video from satellite locations because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The theme for the DNC’s unprecedented virtual convention is meant to show a sharp contrast to Trump, who Democrats say has divided the nation amid one

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Amanda Kloots Says Picking Up Late Husband Nick Cordero’s Ashes Was ‘Beyond Surreal and Horrible’

Amanda Kloots is opening up about the difficult experience of picking up husband Nick Cordero’s ashes.

In an emotional update on Saturday, the fitness instructor — whose husband died at the age of 41 last month from coronavirus complications — spoke about how the past few weeks have been “really hard” for her.

“I’ve literally felt like I can’t even function. Where I’m just kind of in a fog and I don’t even know what I’m doing or what I’m saying,” she said. “Thank God for my brother and sister-in-law because they’ve rescued me and [1-year-old son] Elvis a lot.”

Kloots went on to share that she had recently picked up her late husband’s ashes.

“It was beyond surreal and horrible. But they’re in my possession and a good friend of mine said some beautiful advice: look at it as you have him with you now,” Kloots said. “Which is

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Gov. DeWine explains testing mess; US surpasses 5 million confirmed cases

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine was bullish on coronavirus tests Sunday despite his own testing hiccup as the U.S. reached another astonishing milestone by surpassing 5 million confirmed cases.

The U.S. is home to about one-quarter of cases reported worldwide. And our numbers continue to roar higher: More than 56,000 new U.S. cases were reported Sunday, with more than 1,000 deaths. More than 162,000 Americans have died in little more than six months.

All this as the world neared 20 million cases, a number experts widely believe is underreported due to insufficient testing. 

President Donald Trump’s decision to unilaterally act on the pandemic-driven recession with executive orders drew scalding criticism from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Sunday. Trump, unable to cut a deal with Congress on a new stimulus package, signed an executive order and issued three memorandums Saturday. One would provide an additional $400 per week in unemployment benefits to

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Locals scramble to contain environmental damage

Volunteers in Mauritius are scrambling to create cordons to keep leaking oil from a tanker away from the island.

The MV Wakashio, believed be carrying 4,000 tonnes of oil, ran aground on a coral reef off the Indian Ocean island on 25 July.

Locals are making absorbent barriers of straw stuffed into fabric sacks in an attempt to contain and absorb the oil.

Mauritius is home to world-renowned coral reefs, and tourism is a crucial part of its economy.

Images posted online by local media show volunteers collecting straw from fields and filling sacks to make barriers.

Others have been making their own tubes with tights and hair to add to the effort and some have been cleaning up the island’s beaches.

Their actions go against an order from the government asking people to leave the clean-up to local authorities.

“People have realised that they need to take things into

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Sobbing over the back-to-school display in the grocery store? It’s the coronavirus blues

School supplies. <span class="copyright">(Laurence Mouton / Getty Images)</span>
School supplies. (Laurence Mouton / Getty Images)

In the grocery store the other day, I passed through the “back to school” aisle and promptly burst into tears.

Not the salty-sweet tears that fill your eyes and hang on your lashes before sending a perfect drop or two down your cheek to remind you that you are still alive in an emotional way. Nope, these were throat-spasming sobs, complete with instant mucus production and primative guttural sounds.

It was … excessive. Especially considering how much I, into the ninth year of my third child’s education, hate back-to-school supply shopping. The possibility of not being forced by tradition into increasing our family’s already prodigious collection of erasers, colored pencils and backpacks is one of the few benefits (besides, you know, avoiding a deadly virus) of the online schooling my 8th-grader faces.

Even so, the sight of spiral notebooks and glue sticks sent

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US on brink of 5 million confirmed cases; Trump executive order may have exceeded authority

The U.S. was on the brink of another historic milestone Sunday, poised to surpass 5 million reported cases of COVID-19 — a number roughly equal to one-quarter of total worldwide cases reported.

The numbers continue to roar higher: More than 56,000 new U.S. cases were reported Sunday, with more than 1,000 deaths. More than 162,000 Americans have died in little more than six months.

The Johns Hopkins University’s coronavirus dashboard also reported record-breaking numbers in Brazil, the second hardest-hit nation in terms of deaths and cases. Brazil has now exceeded 100,000 deaths and 3 million cases. 

All this as the world neared 20 million cases, a number experts widely believe is underreported due to insufficient testing. 

The staggering numbers come as world leaders grapple with the ongoing human and economic toll of the virus. President Donald Trump has previously attributed high number of cases in the U.S. to expanded testing,

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The Bizarre Story of a Far-Right Activist Taking COVID Trutherism to Mexico

via Facebook
via Facebook

On April 22, American Gavin Seim caused a minor media firestorm in Mexico when he posted a video on social media showing him flouting COVID-19 restrictions in the city of Santiago de Querétaro. The maskless Seim insisted that the government had no right to close a plaza he was visiting as part of its efforts to limit large gatherings, nor to manage his health. Several media outlets and commentators brushed him off as a disgruntled tourist. The American ambassador to Mexico, Christopher Landau, called him “a spoiled brat and an embarrassment to our country… a perfect example of the ‘Ugly American.’” 

But this was not an isolated incident. Seim is an anti-government activist and coronavirus truther. He falsely claims the coronavirus is a normal flu and that there is no evidence that masks work. Last month, he posted two more accounts of willful violations of mask policies in

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Government may intervene to curb dangerous ‘cancer cure’ propaganda

Cancer patient Arabelle Vanneck is pushed by three young members of her family in wheelcahair - Picasa
Cancer patient Arabelle Vanneck is pushed by three young members of her family in wheelcahair – Picasa

Radical measures to protect the public from fake cancer treatments are under review by the Government, The Telegraph can reveal.

A cross-party coalition of MPs has united in a bid to overhaul the 81-year-old Act of Parliament that authorities currently rely upon to police against deadly cancer-cure propaganda.

The Telegraph understands ministers have discussed expanding the Cancer Act 1939 on numerous fronts – including the policing of medically unproven diagnostics, the prohibition of dangerous treatments, and tighter crackdowns on social media posts.

MPs across the political divide have joined forces over fears that a backlog in cancer treatments during the Covid-19 crisis will lead to an uptick in people seeking dangerous alternative treatments.

Modernisation of the Act will prove to be a “great weapon” in the fight to protect vulnerable and gravely ill

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