Day: July 2, 2020

MA Gyms Work To Make Customers Comfortable For Reopening

BRAINTREE, MA — Gyms in Massachusetts can reopen Monday as phase three of the state’s reopening plan begins amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Gym owners across the state expressed excitement to get back to business, but acknowledged things will not look the same as before they were forced to close in March.

Among those changes, gyms will be required to keep occupancy below 40 percent capacity and sanitize equipment after use. All customers will have to be masked, and various social distancing requirements will be in effect.

>>>MA Gyms Work To Make Customers Comfortable For Reopening

Michael Jablonn co-owns a SetPointRX franchise in Braintree. The gym has six locations throughout the state, and Jablonn said though he’s excited for his gym to reopen, there will be some challenges.

Jablonn told Patch he’s hoping to open Monday, but he’s still reviewing the state guidelines. He said SetPoint RX gyms are set up

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Dentist Wasilla AK | Wasilla Dentist | Dentist near me Alaska | Dental Clinic Alaska

A FOCUS ON COMFORT

Going to the dentist can cause anxiety for some people. At Lane Family Dental in Wasilla, we want you to feel relaxed and comfortable during your visit.

This starts when you first step into the calming atmosphere of our elegant and luxurious waiting room. You will not wait long and you might even wish the wait was a little longer. We provide a variety of luxurious amenities to pamper you. Sit down in one of our comfortable chairs near the warm and homey fireplace as you sip on some coffee or whatever beverage you choose from our complimentary beverage bar.

Our private patient rooms are also equipped with relaxing amenities. We provide you with blankets and pillows for cozy comfort. We also have Netflix available on our flat screen TVs. Would you rather listen to music? Name your genre. Wireless headphones provide you with exceptional

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College Roommates Launch Program to Help Essential Workers in Need: ‘Make a Meaningful Impact’

A group of students at Dartmouth College are doing their part to ensure that no frontline worker struggles to obtain essential items during the coronavirus pandemic — one donor match at a time.

Back in March, roommates Amy Guan and Rine Uhm helplessly watched as their spring semester and summer plans crumbled due to the pandemic.

“We ended up losing internships, I lost my in-person graduation, but at the same time, it was hard to be sad about these losses with everything else going around in the world,” Guan, 21, tells PEOPLE. “We would spend a lot of time reading the news and sharing stories that we found interesting about the risks and struggles that essential workers have been facing.”

“The more we read, the more we realized that there was a lack of access to basic necessities that a lot of other people might have lying around their house

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A List Of Mental Health Resources Available For People Of Color

This month is National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, and right now, access to mental health care for people of color is especially critical. Black people have been watching as a disproportionate number of their loved ones die from the coronavirus pandemic. They’ve watched people who look like them be violently killed or threatened — for nothing more than being Black in public.

Finding a psychologist or mental health worker is difficult for many people. Your health insurance may not cover it. There may be no counselors near you. And Black people face another challenge: In the United States, just 5.3% of psychologists are Black; 83.6% are white. That means that if you’re a person of color searching for a therapist or any other kind of mental health resource, it might be difficult to connect with someone who looks like you.

That’s a problem, since having a therapist of the

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How 5 Serious Athletes Are Handling the Coronavirus Mask Dilemma

If someone were to tell you a year ago that you’d be Googling “best mask for running” or “best mask for working out” in the summer of 2020, you likely would’ve looked at them sideways. And yet here we are: face masks have become an essential part of everyday wear for anyone leaving the house. Many states require you to wear a mask in public if you can’t practice social distancing and the CDC recommends it. While it’s not strictly necessary for outdoor activity if you’re able to stay well-distanced from other people the entire time you’re out, lots of times—say, a run somewhere that is even a little bit crowded—that’s not possible.

But here’s nothing fun about covering your face while you’re working out. Breathing while you’re pushing your limits was already hard enough—going hard while breathing through a barrier feels downright impossible. And it’s only getting worse as

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As COVID closure drags out, AerialCLT is among the Charlotte gyms trying to hang on

AerialCLT, a Charlotte studio known for its aerial silks and trapeze classes, is teetering on the potential of a permanent closure due to the COVID-19 crisis — but the owner isn’t giving up.

In an Instagram announcement on Tuesday, the studio wrote: “AerialCLT Family, we have had 8.5 years of serving you, our community. It is because of you that we have strived to do our very best to get through the past 3.5 months. With your support, we made it further than we thought we would be able to in the beginning of quarantine. We are still applying for grants, loans, rent forgiveness and any other bits of help. To be clear, we are not giving up. We just don’t know what’s next.”

After North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper announced that gyms would not be able to reopen in June, the studio announced its — hopefully temporary — closure.

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Telehealth called a ‘silver lining’ of the COVID-19 pandemic. This time, it might stick

Telehealth use surged from 8% of Americans in December to 29% in May as primary care, mental health and specialists turned to remote care out of necessity during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a UnitedHealth Group report.

Telehealth evangelists long have touted using high-speed Internet connections and a range of devices to link providers and patients for remote care. But regulatory hurdles and medicine’s conservative culture limited virtual checkups to largely minor conditions like sinus infections or unique circumstances such as connecting neurologists to rural hospitals that lack specialized care.

The pandemic lockdowns closed doctors offices and delayed non-emergency care for millions of Americans. Some clinics scrambled to acquire technology platforms to deliver remote care. Others began employing rarely used video programs to reach patients in their homes.

Remote visits among Medicare patients surged through the end of March, prompting Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Director Seema Verma to

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The Dentist Will See You Now: But Will You See the Dentist?

Mary Lyn Koval did not want to go to the dentist. A marketing communications consultant in upstate New York, Koval works from home and felt she was staying safe during the coronavirus pandemic. One of her childhood fillings had broken, however. “I put off going for two weeks. But I was afraid that if I’d exposed a cavity, it would devolve into a series of root canals” instead of a simple filling replacement, she says. Dental offices were then still closed by state order. Yet urgent and emergency procedures were allowed. Should Koval have chosen to delay treatment and risk a root canal—or worse, a tooth extraction? Or should she have risked exposing herself to COVID-19 at the dentist’s office? These questions are all part of the new pandemic calculus.

All states have now allowed dental practices to resume elective procedures (New York started doing so on June 1). Yet

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USC reverses robust fall reopening plans, asks students to stay home for online classes

USC students are being asked to stay home and continue their education online in the fall amid the coronavirus crisis. <span class="copyright">(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)</span>
USC students are being asked to stay home and continue their education online in the fall amid the coronavirus crisis. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Amid the alarming surge in coronavirus spread, USC announced it will no longer bring all undergraduates back to campus for the fall semester and will move to mainly online classes, reversing an earlier decision to welcome students back for a hybrid model.

The decision, announced by Provost Charles Zukoski late Wednesday night, came the same day Gov. Gavin Newsom announced tougher restrictions on indoor activities. Zukoski recommended that students not return to campus for the semester and instead continue their education online.

“The once-in-a-century COVID-19 pandemic has altered every aspect of our lives — the way we interact, work, and socialize — and with each new permutation of the pandemic, we must find ways to thrive,” Zukoski wrote.

“Given the continuing safety restrictions and

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Does your face mask need a filter? We asked medical experts what to look for

We’re all getting used to wearing face coverings while out and about, and you may have noticed that several masks have a small slot to place a filter for extra protection.

Adding a filter in between the layers of your face mask can help block airborne particles that might sneak through the fabric, and can offer some much need reassurance during these uncertain times.

Luckily, you don’t have to spend a fortune on face mask filters, as there are several budget-friendly options available online. To help you get started, Shop TODAY consulted a few health experts to learn what filter materials are most effective, how often you should swap them out and where you can buy them online.

Why you should use a filter in your face mask

When used in conjunction with social distancing practices, cloth face masks can help slow the spread of coronavirus. However, not all masks

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